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Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

Founded in San Francisco, California in 1967, Rolling Stone is a bi-weekly magazine focuses on music, popular culture and politics, now published in New York. It has featured work by many of the best known political and music writers.

Where’s the Money from Monterey Pop?

Report by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, November 1967

For the first issue of Rolling Stone in November, 1967, editor Jann Wenner asked me to do an investigative piece on what had happened to ...

Bill Haley: Wild Bill Haley

Report and Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, November 1967

THERE HE WAS, Wild Bill Haley, fifteen years older but not showing a day of it, his spit curl firmly in place on the forehead ...

Jefferson Airplane: After Bathing At Baxter’s

Review and Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, November 1967

Jefferson Airplane finally finished their third LP Halloween week after two months of off-and-on recording in Los Angeles. It’s called After Bathing at Baxter’s, has ...

Curtis Knight, Jimi Hendrix: Jimi Hendrix: A Shoddy Hendrix Record?

Report by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, January 1968

THE NEW Capitol LP, Got that Feeling: Jimi Hendrix Plays, Curtis Knight Sings, is not what it appears: Hendrix's latest release. The cover, with no ...

Grateful Dead: The First European International Pop Festival: Pigpen To Meet Pope?

Report by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, February 1968

THE FIRST EUROPEAN International Pop Festival, a resounding name for a still rather mysterious event, is being planned for Rome's huge Palazzo dello Sport February ...

Charlatans, The (US): The Charlatans: Pioneer San Francisco Rock Group

Profile and Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, March 1968

While record companies and poster dealers are pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into San Francisco to capture some of that real old authentic hip ...

Merle Haggard: Home-fried Humor and Cowboy Soul

Profile and Interview by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, August 1968

COUNTRY MUSIC is blowing in like a fresh wind from the West. America can't be defined by its pay-toilets and its smog. Merle Haggard never ...

The Band: Friends and Neighbours Just Call Us The Band

Profile and Interview by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, August 1968

NEW YORK: Big Pink is one of those middle class ranch houses of the type that you would expect to find in development row in ...

Mason Williams: The Mason Williams Phonograph Record

Review by Gene Sculatti, Rolling Stone, September 1968

THE RECORDING DEBUT of Mason Williams is an intriguing affair. The Mason Williams Phonograph Record was released many months ago but only recently has it ...

Smokey Robinson, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles: Smokey Robinson

Profile and Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, September 1968

SMOKEY ROBINSON is the reigning genius of Top-40. Since the Beatles and the Beach Boys dropped out of the single-then-follow-up-album pattern aimed at the AM ...

Carl Perkins

Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, December 1968

"IF IT WEREN'T FOR the rocks in its bed, the stream would have no song," said Carl Perkins with a comic dolefulness. He had just ...

John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers: A Hard Road (London)

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, December 1968

This record has some great blues for blues freaks, whether you happen to prefer blues played by whites, blacks, or homosexual Chinese emigrants to the ...

Taj Mahal

Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, January 1969

"WHAT I'M AFRAID of," says Taj Mahal, watching the sun set on Sunset, "are these closet fascists, the guy workin' unloadin' trucks scared to death ...

Crosby Stills and Nash: Crosby, Stills and Nash - The Happiest Sounds You Ever Heard

Interview by Miles, Rolling Stone, February 1969

LONDON - One Sunday before Christmas we went to a flat in Moscow Road to hear what Graham Nash had described by phone as "one ...

Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, March 1969

THE POPULAR FORMULA in England in this, the aftermath era of such successful British bluesmen as Cream and John Mayall, seems to be: add to ...

Foreword to Outlaw Blues by Paul Williams

Book Excerpt by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, April 1969

[For the 21st-century edition of this book, Michael Lydon, a founding editor of Rolling Stone magazine and the author of Rock Folk, Boogie Lightning and ...

MC5: Kick Out The Jams

Review by Lester Bangs, Rolling Stone, April 1969

WHOEVER THOUGHT when that dirty little quickie 'Wild In The Streets' came out that it would leave such an imprint on the culture? First the ...

The Doors, Tim Hardin: Tim Hardin: Hobnobbin' With The Superstars

Report by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, April 1969

LOS ANGELES – The Chateau Marmont is one of the nicest places and reasons to stay in Los Angles. It retains the charm of old ...

Lothar and the Hand People: Lothar and the Hand People (Capitol)

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, May 1969

THERE WAS a strange New York scene a few years ago, when much the same sort of thing was taking place across a continent in ...

Traffic at Berkshire Cottage: Just Playing Together was a Fantasy

Report and Interview by David Dalton, Rolling Stone, May 1969

THE COTTAGE is an hour and a half from London, but it's thousand light years from Soho Square. Henley is like driving through a postcard, ...

Ike & Tina Turner, Ike Turner, Tina Turner: Ike & Tina Turner: River Deep-Mountain High; Outta Season

Review by Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone, May 1969

IKE AND TINA TURNER have been packing suitcases and riding buses for years, playing the Sportmen's Clubs and the Showcase Lounges, sometimes making it into ...

Joni Mitchell

Profile and Interview by uncredited writer, Rolling Stone, May 1969

FOLK MUSIC, which pushed rock and roll into the arena of the serious with protest lyrics and blendings of Dylan and the Byrds back in ...

Mary Hopkin, Paul McCartney: Mary Hopkin: Postcard

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1969

POSTCARD IS AS much Paul McCartney's as it is Mary Hopkin's, which is to say that it is one of those albums on which the ...

Taj Mahal: The Natch'l Blues

Review by Ed Ward, Rolling Stone, May 1969

TAJ MAHAL may not be the most authentic, the most technically proficient, or the most emotionally cathartic practitioner of the blues today, but he certainly ...

The Swan Song of Folk Music

Essay by Happy Traum, Rolling Stone, May 1969

"FOLK MUSIC is dead." We've been hearing that for some time now. The clubs and coffee houses that sprang up all over the country in ...

Procol Harum: A Salty Dog

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1969

A Salty Dog is a confusing album. At its best it represents the group's greatest success to date with the brand of rock for which ...

The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society

Comment by Paul Williams, Rolling Stone, June 1969

I CERTAINLY LOVE the Kinks; it's been fifteen months since I've had a new Kinks album in my hourse, and though I've been listening to ...

The Nice: Ars Longa Vita Brevis (Immediate)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1969

WHAT MAY HAVE turned potential Nice freaks off last year was the group's decision to precede their ritual cataclysm 'Rondo' with a set that consisted ...

The Nice: Nice Work If You Can Get It

Profile by Mark Williams, Rolling Stone, July 1969

THE NICE are the most successful British group to have achieved fame without a single in the top ten. The future is surer for them, ...

Steve Miller: The Steve Miller Band: Brave New World (Capitol)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, July 1969

IF YOU WERE hoping for some new music from the new Steve Miller Band – organist Jim Peterman and guitarist Boz Scaggs have left, and ...

Yes: Yes (Atlantic)

Review by Mark Williams, Rolling Stone, July 1969

THE BRITISH END of the Atlantic Recording Company's operations rarely signs up this country's groups and when it does, they have to be exceedingly good ...

Chuck Willis: I Remember Chuck Willis

Review by Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone, August 1969

EVERY ONCE IN a while something happens that reminds one of the incalculable contribution Atlantic Records has made to rock and roll and rhythm and ...

Country Joe & The Fish: Here We Are Again

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, August 1969

BERKELEY HAS ALWAYS BEEN the Freak Capital of the Western world. The university of California has long been noted for its political militants, and the ...

The Incredible String Band: Incredible String Band: York University, York

Live Review by Michael Gray, Rolling Stone, August 1969

YORK IS A WALLED medieval city that belongs to Rowntrees Chocolate. You step off the train on some evenings and the scent of After Eight ...

MC5: Ronnie Hawkins: Ronnie Hawkins and Mr. Dynamo

Review by Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone, August 1969

RONNIE HAWKINS came down out of the Ozarks, and after gigging with Carl Perkins and Harold Jenkins (later Conway Twitty), he decided he wanted to ...

Joe Cocker: With A Little Help From My Friends

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, August 1969

Joe Cocker and the Grease Band were ending a performance they gave recently at the Whiskey in Los Angeles. As they went into their explosive ...

Steve Cropper: With A Little Help From My Friends/Steve Cropper, Pop Staples, Albert King: Jammed Together (Stax)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, August 1969

LOOK AT THE picture of Steve Cropper on his new album cover and you see what appears to be a quiet, reserved, young man – ...

Grateful Dead: The Grateful Dead: Burnout Sets In

Special Feature by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, August 1969

But I reckon l got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilise ...

Blind Faith: Blind Faith (Atco)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, September 1969

THE YEAR 1969 has not been a very good one for rock and roll. Outside of Tommy and the Band's decision to go on tour, ...

Fairport Convention: What We Did On Our Holidays

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, September 1969

THE FIRST thing I did on receiving this album in the mail was stick it in my cardboard album box – with a good mind ...

The Move, Thunderclap Newman: The Move: 'Curly' (A&M); Thunderclap Newman: 'Something in the Air' (Track)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, October 1969

MY FELLOW devotees of what is frequently referred to as rock and roll's English sound should, on finishing this sentence, rush out willy-nilly in excited ...

Big Mama Thornton: Stronger Than Dirt (Mercury)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, November 1969

ANYBODY WHO has ever seen Big Mama Thornton perform will vouch for the fact that she is a consummate entertainer. So good, in fact, that ...

The Hollies: Words and Music by Bob Dylan (Epic)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1969

THE HOLLIES, an institution in British rock since the very early Beatle days, have always been among the most conservative of English groups. They were, ...

Jimi Hendrix: I Don't Want to be a Clown Any More

Interview by Sheila Weller, Rolling Stone, November 1969

LIBERTY, NEW YORK – Records, film, press and gossip are collectively ambitious in creating the image of a rock superstar. With Jimi Hendrix – as ...

Screamin' Jay Hawkins: What That Is! (Phillips)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1969

THE KEY TO this album is its honesty. Producer Milan Melvin has been faithful to Screamin' Jay and his music right down to the picture ...

Terry Reid: Terry Reid (Epic)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1969

BOUND AS he is to producer Mickie Most, who's good when he's interested and unthinkably horrid when he's not, as is obviously the case here, ...

The Beatles: Abbey Road (Apple)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1969

SIMPLY, SIDE TWO does more for me than the whole of Sgt. Pepper, and I'll trade you The Beatles and Magical Mystery Tour and a ...

The Zombies: Early Days (London)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1969

I PERSONALLY used to spend a lot of time in school carving "What's become of the Zombies" on desks. Which is to say that I ...

Bonzo Dog Band: Bonzo Dog Runs, Fucks Itself

Report and Interview by Loraine Alterman, Rolling Stone, November 1969

NEW YORK — The Bonzo Dog Band, bitter over what they felt was shoddy treatment by their American record company, cut their second U.S. tour ...

Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin II (Atlantic)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, December 1969

Hey, man, I take it all back! This is one fucking heavyweight of an album! OK – I'll concede that until you've listened to the ...

Charlie Rich: Life's Little Ups And Downs

Review by Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone, December 1969

BOB DYLAN HAS SAID more than once that Charlie Rich is one of his favorite musicians – as a songwriter and as a singer. Nik ...

Fleetwood Mac: Then Play On (Reprise)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, December 1969

Nowadays Fleetwood Mac is stepping out on its own. Tired of being another British blues band, the group has said goodbye to Elmore James and ...

King Crimson: In the Court of the Crimson King

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, December 1969

THERE ARE CERTAIN problems to be encountered by any band that is consciously avant-garde. In attempting to sound "farout" the musicians inevitably impose on themselves ...

The Box Tops: Dimensions, Nonstop, Super Hits

Review by Lester Bangs, Rolling Stone, December 1969

THE BOX TOPS? Are you serious? Those yokel hacks grinding out rattly pop for the tyrannical Top 40? Those squeaky-clean goons in paisley scarves and ...

Grateful Dead: Live Dead

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, February 1970

Live Dead explains why the Dead are one of the best performing bands in America, why their music touches on ground that most other groups ...

Jimi Hendrix, The Voices of East Harlem: Hendrix's All-New Band of Gypsys: Fillmore East, New York NY

Live Review by Loraine Alterman, Rolling Stone, February 1970

It's a new year, and a new thing for Jimi — as we saw at the Fillmore East ...

Charlie Rich, Jerry Lee Lewis: Jerry Lee Lewis: Live At The International, Las Vegas; Charlie Rich: Boss Man

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, February 1970

BOTH PIANO-PLAYING singers who started out singing rock and roll with Sam Phillips in Memphis and who have since moved into country and western, Jerry ...

Elvis Presley: Wagging His Tail In Las Vegas

Live Review by David Dalton, Rolling Stone, February 1970

ELVIS WAS SUPERNATURAL, his own resurrection, at the Showroom Internationale in Las Vegas last August. ...

Gene Vincent: Gene Vincent’s Greatest (Capitol); I’m Back And I’m Proud (Dandelion) and more

Review by Simon Frith, Rolling Stone, March 1970

GENE VINCENT was the most tortured of the Fifties rock stars. I only saw him in concert once and that was weird. He was in ...

Charlie Rich: The Many Sides Of Charlie Rich and The Best Years

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, March 1970

IN THESE DAYS of ten new bands each week, there is even another 'new' discovery: Charlie Rich albums for 33c each in a mono record ...

Delaney & Bonnie Homecoming Knocks 'Em Dead

Report and Interview by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, March 1970

NEW YORK – They weren't welcomed at the airport by hordes of screaming, pushing teenagers. They didn't receive a standing ovation at the Fillmore East ...

The Small Faces: Small Faces: The Autumn Stone

Review by Simon Frith, Rolling Stone, March 1970

BEHIND THE KINGS of rock and roll stand the workers who make up the boredom and blarney, the fervour and humbug of pop. They are ...

The Rascals: See

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, March 1970

SOMETIMES ONE wonders if the (Young) Rascals wouldn't be better off just making hit singles. ...

Gene Vincent, Sir Douglas Quintet: Gene Vincent: He Sounded Like Maybe He Was Testifying

Report by Todd Everett, Rolling Stone, March 1970

THE MUSICIANS had all arrived and were standing patiently by the door at two o'clock, Sunday afternoon, March 8th. Three were official members of the ...

Mountain Is One Loud Mother

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, April 1970

SAN FRANCISCO – When Mountain plays, the walls shake and the audience goes crazy. The band born in a recording studio when Felix Pappalardi produced ...

Electric Flag: Intimations of the Electric Flag

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, April 1970

SAN FRANCISCO: The Electric Flag is back – sometimes. The rest of the time, they go by the name "Mike Bloomfield and Friends". ...

Neil Young: Contra Costa Junior College, San Francisco

Live Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, April 1970

EVERYTHING about Neil Young’s approach to music has become so highly personalized that when he performs, he seems at first to be oblivious of his ...

The Youngbloods: Two Trips

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, May 1970

In early 1965, Jesse Colin Young recorded an excellent solo album on Mercury (now out-of-print) called Young Blood. Truckin' along in relative obscurity in the ...

The Rolling Stones: King Hash Is Sure To Come

Report and Interview by Sheila Weller, Rolling Stone, May 1970

TANGIER – He shakes another pebble oul of the foot-long, coral-and silver-encrusted stash pouch, pokes an amber-ringed forefinger under the schlockedelic fake-silk ascot he has ...

MC5: Back in the USA

Review by Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone, May 1970

WOP-BOP-A-LU-BOP-A-LOP-BAM-BOOM. Thud. 'Tutti Frutti', which opens the partly excellent MC5 album, is easily the worst cut on it, and in a way a clue to ...

The Move: Shazam

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1970

...

Little Richard, Child Of God

Interview by David Dalton, Rolling Stone, May 1970

I DIDN'T GET to see Little Richard at the Atlantic City Pop Festival where he followed Janis Joplin and revived his own legend, but when ...

Paul Simon, Simon & Garfunkel: Paul Simon

Interview by Loraine Alterman, Rolling Stone, May 1970

PAUL SIMON arrived wearing a blue loden coat with the hood pulled up. Beneath it he had on black trousers and a black shirt. He ...

The Faces, The Small Faces: The Small Faces: First Step

Review by Joel Selvin, Rolling Stone, May 1970

THE SMALL FACES are now into a more sophisticated and mature commerciality. The addition of Rod Stewart as vocalist and Ron Wood on lead guitar ...

Fairport Convention: Unhalfbricking/Liege and Lief

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1970

UNHALFBRICKING AND Liege and Lief are the two last albums by the Fairport Convention with Sandy Denny. ...

The Beatles, George Harrison: George Harrison: Why Is George In New York?

Report and Interview by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, June 1970

Sunrise doesn't last all morning The cloudburst doesn't last all day Seems my love is up and has left with no warning But it's not ...

The Beatles: Let It Be (Apple)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1970

TO THOSE WHO found their work since the White Album as emotionally vapid as it was technically breathtaking, the news that the Beatles were about ...

Country Joe & The Fish, Jefferson Airplane: Kent Aftermath: Teen Turmoil Poison At B.O.

Report and Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, June 1970

SAN FRANCISCO — Lou Rhode, a student at San Francisco City College, is a clerk at Tower Records, and wears an "Out Now" peace button ...

Miles Davis & Louis Armstrong: You Learn How to Defend Your Style

Essay by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, July 1970

NEW YORK — There was something sad about it, this party thrown by old men for someone older still, and yet you had to have ...

The Who: At The Metropolitan Opera House

Live Review by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, July 1970

THE WHO is a group that was nurtured in gimmickry. I remember five years ago Brian Jones calling me up on the trans-Atlantic phone to ...

Van Morrison: In Conversation

Interview by Happy Traum, Rolling Stone, July 1970

VAN MORRISON sits on the edge of the bed and absently picks an old Gibson. He is moody, his eyes intense and his smile sudden; ...

Janis Joplin’s Full-tilt Boogie Ride

Report and Interview by David Dalton, Rolling Stone, August 1970

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky – Janis Joplin and her newly-formed band, Janis Joplin Full-Tilt Boogie, debuted here June 12th, their first gig since they started rehearsing together ...

Steve Miller: Grand Designs For The Future

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, September 1970

STEVE MILLER sits at his kitchen table, bent over a series of diagrams and flow charts he's drawing that outline the business side of a ...

Grateful Dead: An Evening with the Grateful Dead

Report and Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, September 1970

WE CHANGE and our changings change, a friend said once. It sounded true, but it seems too that through it all we stay the same. ...

Little Richard: The Rill Thing

Review by Joel Selvin, Rolling Stone, September 1970

AS INCREDIBLE AS IT may seem, Little Richard is as great as he says he is. His new album, the first in three years, is ...

Johnny Winter, Rick Derringer: Johnny Winter: On Music, Hype and Happiness

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, October 1970

FOR TOO long there, it seemed to Johnny Winter like he would never be known for his music as much as he would be known ...

Swamp Dogg: 'Whistle Dixie Out Your Ass': Swamp Dogg

Report and Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, October 1970

SAN FRANCISCO – Swamp Dogg had just finished taping a four-song set for a quadraphonic television show, and now everyone was up in the control ...

Jimi Hendrix: A Funeral In His Home Town

Report by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, October 1970

Seattle, Washington – It had been very hot and sunny the last few days in Seattle, most unusual for this time of year. But on ...

Elton John Steams 'Em Up

Report and Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, November 1970

LONDON – "If this is the revolution, why are the drinks so fucking expensive," someone has written on the wall in the toilet of London's ...

Elton John: Elton John

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1970

GIVEN THAT HIS voice combines the nasal sonority of James Taylor with the rasp of Van Morrison with the slurry intonation of M. Jagger with ...

Humble Pie: Town and Country; As Safe As Yesterday Is; Humble Pie

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, November 1970

HUMBLE PIE'S debut album was released only in England. It was called Town and Country and was, for the most part, quiet and basically acoustic ...

The Moody Blues: Moody Blues: A Question Of Balance

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1970

RECENTLY SOMETHING of unexaggerable beauty came into my life, something that was to enthrall me musically and elevate me spiritually, to pour oil on the ...

Jackie Lomax is Leaving London

Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, November 1970

LONDON – Jackie Lomax is from Liverpool. He's 26 and he writes songs and sings them. ...

Badfinger: No Dice

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, December 1970

With their new album No Dice, Badfinger has to their credit one of the best records of the year. This album is literally a quantum ...

Captain Beefheart: Lick My Decals Off, Baby

Review by Ed Ward, Rolling Stone, December 1970

WHEN I FIRST heard Trout Mask Replica, I about puked. What is this shit, I thought. People I met talked about it in glowing terms ...

Creedence Clearwater Revival: Pendulum: Creedence Got a New Kind of Bag

Report and Interview by Joel Selvin, Rolling Stone, December 1970

BERKELEY — Creedence Clearwater Revival is rolling again, and in several directions, with their upcoming new album, Pendulum. ...

The Faces, Rod Stewart: Rod Stewart: In Conversation

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, December 1970

"I was very pleased with it when we finished, and I still am," Rod Stewart said of his first solo LP. With good reason. ...

Velvet Underground: The Velvet Underground: Loaded

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, December 1970

LOU REED HAS always steadfastly maintained that the Velvet Underground were just another Long Island rock 'n' roll band. But in the past he really ...

MC5: High Time (Atlantic)

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, 1971

‘SISTER ANNE,’ ‘Over And Over,’ and ‘Gotta Keep Movin’’ on the new MC5 album are without doubt among the best hard rock performances of the ...

Grand Funk Railroad: Live Album

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, January 1971

"IT'S GOOD... ’cause, like, their music is getting better and better all the time, it’s like, you know, what people want to hear." ...

Jack Bruce And His Lifetime

Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, January 1971

LONDON – It's the universal riff. When some kid in Laguna Beach finally stops driving all the neighbors crazy with it, a kid sitting by ...

The Kinks: Lola Vs. Powerman And The Moneygoround (Part One)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, January 1971

SO, APPARENTLY having forgotten the Byrds' words of caution, you wanna be a rock and roll star, eh? Before you trade in your stereo components ...

Bob Seger: Mongrel

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, January 1971

When viewed in the context of his two previous albums, Bob Seger's Mongrel fares very favorably. It's easily his best over-all work to date, but ...

David Bowie: The Man Who Sold The World

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, February 1971

"Some say the view is crazy/But you may adopt another point of view. So if it's much too hazy/You can leave my friend and me ...

Quicksilver Messenger Service: What About Me (Capitol)

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, February 1971

QUICKSILVER displayed acute weaknesses on their previous album and they remain very much in evidence on What About Me. Though the group has polished up ...

John Cale, Nico, Velvet Underground: Shards of Velvet Afloat in London: Nico and John Cale

Report and Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, February 1971

JOHN CALE REACHES too hard for the pay phone in the lobby of his hotel. Bang. It explodes into the soft corner of his forehead, ...

The James Gang, Little Richard: Little Richard Takes El's Advice

Report by David Dalton, Rolling Stone, March 1971

CLEVELAND – "I'm going to tell Elvis what you did for me, hear?" Richard whispers to the stewardess as she leans over to deposit two ...

Spirit: 12 Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus

Review by Nick Tosches, Rolling Stone, March 1971

ANY ILLUSIONS that might still be clung to along the order of Spirit's being an Epic house organ anthropomorphization-of-eclecticism shuck, complete with baldpated, cerebral – ...

King Crimson, McDonald and Giles: Mcdonald & Giles (Cotillion)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, March 1971

IGNORING THE TINY VOICE from within that insisted that, having cared for King Crimson not one iota, I would probably not find the work of ...

The Faces: Faces: Long Player (Warner Bros.)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, March 1971

BEING ONE OF the few English bands left willing (nay, all too happy) to flaunt their Englishness, and moreover ranking no lower than third on ...

Various: British Blues Archive Series Vols. 1 And 2

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, March 1971

IT ALL SEEMED TO happen quite suddenly when in late 1966 and 1967 the United States’ record stores were deluged with a staggering number of ...

David Bowie: Pantomime Rock?

Report and Interview by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, April 1971

Los Angeles: in his floral-patterned velvet midi-gown and cosmetically enhanced eyes, in his fine chest-length blonde hair and mod nutty engineer’s cap that he bought ...

Jimi Hendrix: The Cry Of Love

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, April 1971

MAYBE IT’S JUST my imagination, but the Jimi Hendrix section of my local record bin seems to have been growing at an astonishing pace lately. ...

Leon Russell: Working Hard At the Lyceum

Live Review by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, April 1971

LONDON – "Aw...bet you thought I couldn't rock and roll," the piano player says, plunging into the music. ...

Alice Cooper: Love It To Death

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, April 1971

IT CAME ON the radio in the late afternoon and from the first note it was right: Alice Cooper bringing it all back home again. ...

Baby Huey: The Baby Huey Story: The Living Legend

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, April 1971

BABY HUEY never made it; not really. At his peak, when he was the stellar attraction of a rhythm and blues circuit that stretched from ...

Emerson Lake And Palmer: Emerson, Lake & Palmer: Emerson, Lake & Palmer

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, April 1971

WE WERE FOREWARNED by the British music press that Emerson, Lake & Palmer would be a "super-group," and indeed it was hard to see how ...

The Rolling Stones: Goodbye Great Britain: The Rolling Stones On Tour

Report and Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, April 1971

LONDON – "Boogie, Bobby, boogie," Marshall Chess is saying over and over to Bobby Keys in the seat next to him, slamming out the phrase ...

Matthews' Southern Comfort: Matthews Southern Comfort: Later That Same Year

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, April 1971

AS HAS been suggested before in these pages, if mellow tuneful close-harmony country-tinged polite-rock of the sort that is considered indispensable by those who own ...

The Guess Who, The Moody Blues: The Moody Blues: In The Beginning/The Guess Who: Sown and Grown in Canada

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, April 1971

THESE TWO ALBUMS have quite a bit in common; both consist of early material released now to cash in on the popularity of the groups ...

Loudon Wainwright III: A Tale of Loudon Wainwright III

Interview by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, April 1971

NEW YORK – The word was out, carried by the wind and a few strategic newspaper clippings, and everybody, everybody was making it on down ...

Crazy Horse: Crazy Horse

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, April 1971

FROM THE VERY start, friends, I've always wished I could enjoy Creedence Clearwater as much as I admire them for their unremitting tunefulness and refreshing ...

Humble Pie: Rock On

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, May 1971

It seems that Humble Pie didn't quite hit the US the right way. ...

Black Oak Arkansas: Black Oak Arkansas (Atco)

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1971

IT IS SAID that before they became a rock and roll band Black Oak Arkansas were a teenage gang the mere mention of whose name ...

Phil Ochs: God Help The Troubadour

Profile and Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, May 1971

Who was that foolThrew the basket in the pool? ...

The Chambers Brothers: New Generation

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, May 1971

AT THE OUTSET, the Chambers Brothers were a warmly exciting gospel act (catalogued on a series of fine albums released by Vault), but they apparently ...

The Flamin' Groovies: The Flamin’ Groovies: Teenage Head (Kama Sutra)

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, May 1971

I’VE BEEN betting on the Flamin’ Groovies a long time. When they used to come on stage at Golden Gate Park love-ins and all the ...

Badfinger: Woo, Liverpool Accents

Profile and Interview by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, June 1971

LOS ANGELES – Badfinger started out five years ago as the Ivys, who soft-rocked around small clubs in London and recorded about 100 of their ...

The Rascals: Five Years Of The Rascals

Retrospective by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, June 1971

I KNOW THIS may be sound a little overboard, but there once was a time when the Young Rascals were the greatest rock & roll ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott the Hoople: Wildlfe

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, June 1971

THE OUTCOME of the battle has yet to be conclusively determined, but my scorecard gives the race for "The Most Beloved Rock And Roll Band ...

Procol Harum: Broken Barricades

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, June 1971

TO FANS OF the group, Procol Harum's history has been like this: an excellent first album, Procol Harum, a shaky and very uneven second album, ...

The Holy Modal Rounders: Good Taste Is Timeless

Review by Nick Tosches, Rolling Stone, June 1971

PETER STAMPFEL, who, with Steve Weber, was, and remains, half of the driving force behind the Rounders, later paid off a debt he owed me ...

The Young Rascals: Five years of the Rascals

Profile by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, June 1971

I KNOW THIS may sound a little overboard, but there once was a time when the Young Rascals were the greatest rock & roll band ...

Jackie Lomax: Home Is In My Head

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, June 1971

JACKIE LOMAX' FIRST album, released in 1969 on Apple, was produced by George Harrison, contained an excellent single ('The Eagle Laughs At You' b/w 'Sour ...

The Guess Who: The Best of The Guess Who

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, June 1971

THE GUESS WHO, despite their good intentions, have never seemed like natural candidates for superstardom. With a collective personality that could be described as lumpy ...

Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks: Dan Hicks And His Hot Licks: Where’s The Money

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, July 1971

DAN HICKS is a person of no mean strangeness, a genuine original, and one of the greatest superheroes in all of 20th century popular music. ...

Rod Stewart: Every Picture Tells A Story

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, July 1971

HE HAS IT IN him, has Rod Stewart, to save a lot of souls, to rescue those of us who are too old for Grand ...

Graham Nash: Songs for Beginners

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, July 1971

IF YOU ACCEPT Graham Nash on his own terms, which is simply as a nice guy who somehow wound up a musician, then you probably ...

The James Gang: Thirds

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, July 1971

By no exertion of the imagination are James Gang the greatest rock and roll band ever to walk the face of the earth or anything ...

Clarence Carter: Slippin' Away With Clarence Carter

Interview by Joel Selvin, Rolling Stone, August 1971

SAN FRANCISCO – Clarence Carter leaves his Holiday Inn room on the arm of his road manager, who looks familiar. It's Rodgers Redding, and it's ...

Ian Matthews: If You Saw Thro' My Eyes (Vertigo)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1971

AFTER A TWO-ALBUM stint with Fairport Convention, Ian Matthews made a solo LP, Matthews Southern Comfort, formed a band called Matthews Southern Comfort, and proceeded ...

Stephen Stills: Stephen Stills 2

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, August 1971

WHAT WE HAVE HERE, friends, is a fifth-rate album by a solid second-rate artist who so many lower-middlebrows insist on believing is actually first-rate, even ...

Keith Richards, The Rolling Stones: The Rolling Stone Interview: Keith Richards

Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, August 1971

KEITH PLAYS in a rock & roll band. Anita is a movie star queen. They currently reside in a large white marble house that everyone ...

MC5: High Time

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, September 1971

IT SEEMS almost too perfectly ironic that now, at a time in their career when most people have written them off as either dead or ...

Fairport Convention: Angel Delight

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, September 1971

Angel Delight is a happy event, for it sharpens and solidifies the tentative steps the Fairport Convention took in Full House, their first post-Sandy Denny ...

Flo & Eddie, Frank Zappa, The Turtles: Howard Kaylan: Mother Was A Turtle

Interview by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, September 1971

LOS ANGELES – Working in the Turtles, working in the Mothers, it's all the same, Harold Kaylan says. But he has undergone a transition nevertheless. ...

Jack Bruce: Harmony Row

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, September 1971

JACK BRUCE GOT a bad deal. Following the break-up of Cream Bruce was the only member of the band to emerge with less than "superstar" ...

Big Brother & The Holding Company: Big Brother : How Hard It Is

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, September 1971

IT HAS RIGHTEOUSLY ranked my ass to see the shabby treatment accorded Big Brother and the Holding Company over the course of the past four ...

Fanny: Charity Ball

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, October 1971

WELL, LET'S SEE...first there was Goldie and the Gingerbreads and the UFO's. Then Cake, who were merely New York's answer to the Ronettes, and the ...

The Move: Looking On/Message From the Country

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, October 1971

WHEN LAST we glimpsed The Move in these pages they had recently completed what was without the slightest glimmer of doubt the finest English rock ...

Wet Willie: Wet Willie

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1971

WET WILLIE is young five-man group originally from Mobile, Alabama, that's been touring with the Allman Brothers Band lately, and winning a bunch of new ...

McGuinness Flint: Happy Birthday, Ruthy Baby

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, October 1971

ON THEIR SECOND album, McGuinness Flint have sunk into a mire of vapid eclecticism rather than develop a unified style. Meaning this: rather than be ...

Grateful Dead: The Grateful Dead: Grateful Dead (Warners)

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, November 1971

To avoid any possible disappointments for those who once had visions of saving the world through the music on Anthem of the Sun and any ...

J. Geils Band: The J. Geils Band: The Morning After (Atlantic)

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, November 1971

Call ‘em the best new band of 1971, if you will, ‘cause that’s what they are, and here’s the goods to prove it: The Morning ...

Black Oak Arkansas

Interview by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1971

LOS ANGELES – On stage, almost scary, are Black Oak Arkansas. ...

The Strawbs: From The Witchwood (A&M)

Review by Jonh Ingham, Rolling Stone, November 1971

THE STRAWBS started out as a bluegrass duo, went through incarnations with Sandy Denny in her pre-Fairport days and a cellist from Sadler's Wells Opera ...

Detroit: Detroit

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, December 1971

HAVE NO FEAR. Mitch Ryder is back. and for those whose last recollection of him centers around a grotesquely Las Vegas type of showboat soul ...

Fleetwood Mac: Future Games

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, December 1971

BACK IN the Bar-Mitzvah days of the drug culture the British music scene was shaken by what came to be known as The Blues Boom. ...

Jerry Lee Lewis: Monsters

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, December 1971

IT'S A WELL-KEPT SECRET, but this album tossed off with ten others in a recent release by the Shelby Singleton Corp., is one of the ...

Three Dog Night: Harmony

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1971

FOR THREE YEARS now, the critics have been laying into Three Dog Night for a variety of mostly hard-to-fathom reasons. But nobody, evidently, has been ...

Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin IV

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, December 1971

IT MIGHT SEEM a bit incongruous to say that Led Zeppelin — a band never particularly known for its tendency to understate matters — has ...

Steppenwolf: For Ladies Only

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1971

STEPPENWOLF IS LIKE the football club that always wins more than it loses, and perennially finishes second or third in its conference – something like ...

Stone The Crows: Brash Tales of Stone The Crows

Profile and Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, January 1972

ALL ALONG the super ye-ye, tres decadent beaches of St. Tropez this summer, the absolute super coolest most single chic garment one could be seen ...

David Bowie: Hunky Dory

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, January 1972

DAVID BOWIE, the swinging/mod Garbo, male femme fatale, confidante to and darling of the avant-garde on both sides of the Atlantic, and shameless outrage, is ...

Grand Funk Railroad: E Pluribus Funk

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, January 1972

HAD GRAND FUNK listened more to the Standells and less to Cream, they might have turned out to be a really great group. The background ...

Tom T. Hall: In Search of a Song

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, January 1972

FACT IS, In Search of a Song doesn't quite match the quality of any of Hall's three previous Mercury albums. Meaning only that a couple ...

Badfinger: Straight Up

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, January 1972

STRAIGHT UP is a big disappointment coming after Badfinger's previous superb album, No Dice. I remember reading a quote by drummer Mike Gibbons saying that ...

Wings: Wild Life

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, January 1972

LIKE PAUL MCCARTNEY'S first two post-Beatles albums, Wild Life is largely high on sentiment but rather flaccid musically and impotent lyrically, trivial and unaffecting. ...

Gilbert O'Sullivan: Himself

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, February 1972

DON'T BE MISLED: however extraordinary Gilbert O'Sullivan may look in his imbecile haircut, knickers, and other things Thirties Irish schoolboy, he sounds sufficiently like your ...

Big Joe Turner, Chuck Willis, The Clovers, The Coasters, The Drifters, LaVern Baker: Joe Turner/LaVern Baker/The Clovers/The Coasters/The Drifters/Chuck Willis: Greatest Recordings

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, February 1972

IN 1967, ARETHA Franklin moved from Columbia to Atlantic – in what soon proved to be one of the most important moments in the history ...

Sonny & Cher: Live

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, February 1972

I'M SURE I'LL never understand why it's become so fashionable to belittle Sonny & Cher, to blame everything from the dissolution of the Beatles to ...

The Kinks: Muswell Hillbillies

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, February 1972

CAN YOU TELL the Kinks apart in the picture on the cover of their new album? No, of course. Except for Ray, they all look ...

Grin: 1+1

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1972

THE DEBUT ALBUM of Nils Lofgren's trio, Grin, brilliantly closed the quartet of albums that had begun with the Neil Young/Crazy Horse collaboration, Everybody Knows ...

Ian Matthews: Tigers Will Survive

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, February 1972

ONCE UPON A time Ian Matthews was a member of Fairport Convention. Fairport Convention then decided they wanted to head in the direction of traditional ...

Janis Joplin: Janis!

Interview by David Dalton, Rolling Stone, February 1972

"I’M GOING to write a book about you," David Dalton told Janis Joplin when she was beginning her first tour with her Full Tilt Boogie ...

Harry Nilsson: Nilsson: Nilsson Schmilsson (RCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1972

IS NILSSON just an old-school crooner in modern dress? Is he a writer of children's songs who wants to broaden his appeal? And why does ...

Tom Rapp: Beautiful Lies You Could Live In

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, February 1972

IT'S PAINFULLY OBVIOUS that Tom Rapp has some serious obstacles littering his path to musical/ poetic fulfillment. ...

Jackson Browne: Jackson Browne

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1972

IT'S NOT OFTEN that a single album is sufficient to place a new performer among the first rank of recording artists. Jackson Browne's long-awaited debut ...

Loggins & Messina: Kenny Loggins with Jim Messina "Sittin' In"

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1972

THIS ALBUM answers the "whatever happened to Jim Messina?" question resoundingly. Although singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins is very much in the forefront throughout the album, Messina's ...

Yes: Fragile

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, March 1972

THE SURE AND STEADY pace at which Yes has progressed through their four albums seems to suit them just fine, and in Fragile the fruit ...

Fats Domino: Fats Domino

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, March 1972

Fats goes to college, all his big hits and more, decked out in a double album that has a 12-page insert of pictures, information, analysis, ...

Jan & Dean: Legendary Masters Series

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, March 1972

JAN AND DEAN were real clowns. I saw 'em on the TAMI Show back in 1965 and they were the only downer part in the ...

Little Feat: Sailin' Shoes

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1972

NOW, HERE'S A BAND with a mission. Little Feat is hewn from the same piece of oak as the Byrds, the Band, and the Flying ...

Manfred Mann: Manfred Mann's Earth Band

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, March 1972

SO MANFRED MANN are back doing rock and roll, and Paul Jones (the original Manfred's lead singer and premier star) has come out with an ...

Neil Young: Harvest

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, March 1972

At the end of this, five'll getcha ten, most of you are going to be exclaiming lividly, "O what vile geeks are rock critics! How ...

Yes: The Great Yes Technique Debate

Profile and Interview by Steve Turner, Rolling Stone, March 1972

London — "I tell you this much," said the studio doorman, "it’s been a real eye-opener working here. See, my generation don’t really appreciate how ...

Fairport Convention: Babbacombe Lee

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, April 1972

"JOHN LEE, the jury has found you guilty of willful murder, and the sentence of the court upon you is that you be taken from ...

Dave Edmunds: Rockpile

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1972

A YEAR AGO, Englishman Dave Edmunds introduced himself to the rock audience through a scrupulously crafted recording of 'I Hear You Knockin'', once a Fats ...

America: America

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, April 1972

WHAT HAVE WE HERE, O my sisters and brothers, but an album that serves as living proof that if you release 88 albums every month, ...

Cream: Live Cream Volume II

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, April 1972

IN THEIR GLORY DAYS of 1967-8, Cream singlehandedly spawned the whole genre of aloof heavy rock egomania, not to mention a whole school of insufferably ...

Savoy Brown: Hellbound Train

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1972

Savoy Brown was once a resolutely typical British blues band. They could boogy an audience into submission in no time at all, and then keep ...

Steve Miller Band: Recall The Beginning…

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1972

WAY BACK in the Sixties, three bands in particular were responsible for recharging my rock fanaticism – Procol Harum, the Byrds, and the Steve Miller ...

The Rolling Stones: The Stones in LA: Main St. Exiles

Report and Interview by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, April 1972

LOS ANGELES – One year, to the weekend, after the Rolling Stones played the final concert of their "farewell" tour of England, Mick Jagger is ...

Brinsley Schwarz: Silver Pistol

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

SHADES OF Highway 61 Revisited, Sweetheart of the Rodeo, The Band, The Gilded Palace of Sin, Workingman's Dead were so integral a part of Brinsley ...

Cat Mother Cat Mother

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

WHEN THE members of Cat Mother had a house on East Tenth Street, the group got together with Jimi Hendrix, who was in a producing ...

Humble Pie: Smokin' (A&M)

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, May 1972

HUMBLE PIE have persevered. Their first record company (Immediate) went out of business, vile-tempered record reviewers slandered their early albums from here to Zanzibar, and ...

Black Oak Arkansas: Keep The Faith

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, May 1972

LESTER BANGS tells the Black Oak Arkansas story in his own words: ...

Delaney & Bonnie: Delaney & Bonnie Together (Columbia)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

SOME PERFORMERS strain through prolonged public growing pains on their way to artistic maturity. Others simply appear with all their faculties fully intact. ...

Long John Baldry: John Baldry: Everything Stops For Tea

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, May 1972

WHEN IS someone going to come out and say that, despite all the hype and hoopla, John Baldry is a non-talent poseur that would never ...

Crosby Stills and Nash, Stephen Stills: Stephen Stills,Graham Nash and David Crosby Albums

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

Stephen Stills: ManassasGraham Nash/David Crosby: Graham Nash/David Crosby ...

The Kinks: The Kink Kronikles

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, May 1972

IN THE VERY first paragraph of his liner notes to The Kink Kronikles, John Mendelssohn emphasizes the Kinks' position as an underdog band. Perhaps even ...

The Wackers: Wackers: Hot Wacks

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, May 1972

IN THE EARLY part of 1966, a group called the Family Tree used to play at the old Fillmore a lot. They did Beatles songs ...

Dr. John: Gumbo

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, June 1972

WIPE YOUR MIND clean of all you have ever heard and read about Dr. John the Night Tripper. If you knew that once he was ...

Fleetwood Mac: Bare Trees

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

FLEETWOOD MAC'S last two records, Kiln House and Future Games, have between them provided me with perhaps a hundred hours of enjoyment. And that's the ...

Jeff Beck: Jeff Beck Group

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1972

Should you ever find yourself in the mood to be bored comatose, simply hop on the next jet to Hollywood, where this writer will gladly ...

Jerry Lee Lewis: The Killer Rocks On

Review by Lester Bangs, Rolling Stone, June 1972

THERE'S NOT TOO MANY of those greasy rockers still hanging around from their '50s heydaze good for much more than playing 50 tank towns a ...

Lindisfarne: Fog on the Tyne

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

FOG ON the Tyne has been just about the biggest album in Great Britain this year. The single off the album, 'Meet Me on the ...

Procol Harum: Live with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, June 1972

If you're put off by pretensions of grandiosity in music, if all you want to do is get funky and boogie around, you've probably never ...

Quicksilver Messenger Service: Quicksilver Messenger service: Comin' Thru

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, June 1972

DINO VALENTI had a pretty good niche in history carved out for a while: he wrote (or at least claimed to have written) 'Hey Joe', ...

Mother Earth, Tracy Nelson: Tracy Nelson/Mother Earth: Tracy Nelson/Mother Earth

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, June 1972

MUZAK ROCK is a difficult art. Because the line between soulfulness and boredom is often a thin one, few artists can pull it off. Van ...

Grand Funk Railroad: Mark, Don & Mel

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1972

VIRTUALLY EVERY practicing rock critic worth his sneer, of course, has sought to explicate Grand Funk's ascent to commercial ultra-gargantuanity over countless identically horrible Cream ...

Grand Funk Railroad: Track On! The Best of Mark Farner, Terry Knight & Donnie Brewer

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, June 1972

WOW, TALK ABOUT obscure rock history! Do you care that Mark Farner was once in a group called the Bossmen? Do you think the average ...

John Hammond: I'm Satisfied

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, June 1972

THE QUESTION OF whether a white man can sing the deltoid blues has long been answered by John Hammond in the only way possible: that ...

Mountain: The Road Goes On Forever

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, June 1972

MOUNTAIN, A BAND now departed for the great Fillmore in the Sky, was a standby whipping boy for practically any rock critic, regardless of taste. ...

The Eagles: The Eagles

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

THE EAGLES' 'Take It Easy' is simply the best sounding rock single to come out so far this year. The first time through, you could ...

Flying Burrito Brothers: The Flying Burrito Brothers : Last of the Red Hot Burritos

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

The fourth – and presumably last – album of the Flying Burrito Bros. is, as it were, a departure. Not only is this album live, ...

Free: Free At Last

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, July 1972

RESURRECTED FROM what seemed a permanent split, Free is making a second bid at capturing the American public's heart. ...

Harry Chapin Takes 'Taxi' Wherever He Can

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, July 1972

"I NEVER REALLY drove a cab," said Harry Chapin, the filmmaker-turned folkstar, "But I do have a hack license in case of emergencies – like ...

The Everly Brothers: Stories We Could Tell

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1972

THE EVERLY BROTHERS brought harmony to rock and roll. They also brought sensitivity, the result of their having been weaned on old-time country music. They ...

The Raspberries: Fresh

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, July 1972

IT STARTS OFF with that unforgettable drum fill from 'Loco-Motion', now over a decade old, and then right into the opening chords from 'One Fine ...

The Raspberries: Raspberries

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, July 1972

RASPBERRIES opens with the finest burst of lightweight English rock I've heard all year, a raunchy 16-bar guitar intro, and followed by a verse that ...

The Rolling Stones Tour: Rock & Roll On The Road Again

Report by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, July 1972

LOS ANGELES – Danny has no shirt, no shoes, no wallet, no keys. The shirt went when he took it off and stuck it in ...

The Rolling Stones: Exile On Main St. (Rolling Stones)

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, July 1972

THERE ARE SONGS that are better, there are songs that are worse, there are songs that'll become your favourites and others you'll probably lift the ...

Argent: All Together Now

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, July 1972

THE ZOMBIES/ARGENT relationship is very close, much like that of the Small Faces/Humble Pie or the Yardbirds/Led Zeppelin. In each case a group splits due ...

David Bowie: The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, July 1972

UPON THE RELEASE of David Bowie's most thematically ambitious, musically coherent album to date, the record in which he unites the major strengths of his ...

The Rolling Stones: Jumpin' Gas Flash Bops In Heartland

Report by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, July 1972

IN TRANSIT – Underway at last. In flight and moving. Denver, Minneapolis, and Chicago in one Sunday, the limo to the plane to the limo ...

The Strawbs: Grave New World

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1972

WHEN DAVE COUSINS got together with Tony Hooper to form the Strawbs, he was writing songs strongly influenced by British and American traditional music. ...

The Rolling Stones Go South

Report by Robert Greenfield, Rolling Stone, August 1972

IN CHICAGO, in the house that Playboy built, an anonymous brownstone on a quiet leafy street that Hugh Hefner calls home, the scene is a ...

Van Dyke Parks: Discover America

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, August 1972

VAN DYKE PARKS' first album, Song Cycle, released in 1968, was a dizzyingly eclexoteric work that had the critics alternately gushing, "The emergence of a ...

Eric Andersen: Blue River

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, August 1972

ERIC ANDERSEN is not one who has been graced with the best of luck. ...

Peter Frampton: Wind of Change

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, August 1972

MR. FRAMPTON IS, as the pages of rock history tell us, a young lad who has gone through many a musical change, which could be ...

Spring: Spring

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, August 1972

SPRING IS MARILYN and Diane Rovell who, as the Honeys, recorded such 45s as 'Surfin' Down the Swanee River', and urged: "Push 'em back! Push ...

Wishbone Ash: Argus

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, August 1972

OF THE SCADS of similarities between Wishbone Ash and Yes, the most trivial and accidental (and so most interesting) is the fact that both groups ...

Bob Weir: Ace

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1972

REVIEWS OF GRATEFUL Dead records are invariably written by those who've been touched by that mysterious and to me incomprehensible power-to-enchant that exists somewhere in ...

Ike Turner: Blues Roots

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, August 1972

PEOPLE ALWAYS ask why Ike Turner is content to stand in the background, playing those fine guitar riffs to an audience totally oblivious to him ...

Procol Harum and The Amateur Ork

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, August 1972

LOS ANGELES – "Well, we're only in our first year here at the magicians' college," Dave Ball, Procol Harum guitarist, advised the gentleman who has ...

Yes: Close To The Edge

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, September 1972

WITH Close to the Edge, their fifth album, Yes have formed a coherent musical language from the elements that have been kicked around by progressive ...

Bonzo Dog Band: Let's Make Up and Be Friendly

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, September 1972

Pity.For a brief span of time that segment of the population who dwell happily in out-of-the-way corners of human consciousness had their ideal musical spokesmen ...

Foghat: Foghat (Bearsville)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1972

THAT'S FOGHAT, not Hogfat. And not Savoy Brown either, although with Lonesome Dave Peverett and Roger Earl in the lineup, one might see Hog – ...

Professor Longhair: New Orleans Piano (Atlantic)

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, September 1972

ALL RIGHT, ALL RIGHT. Gather round, all you fans of the Shuffling Hungarians, the Four Hairs, the Blues Scholars, and the Blues Jumpers, 'cause 'Fess ...

Three Dog Night: Seven Separate Fools

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, September 1972

ACCORDING TO AN ever-increasing pile of Levinson-Ross press releases at my right elbow, this has been quite a summer for Three Dog Night. Their heralded ...

Johnny Nash: I Can See Clearly Now

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, October 1972

AT LAST, REGGAE as all-around entertainment, whose rhythms will still generate movement in a crowded basement discotheque but whose arrangements and moods shift often enough ...

Slade: Slade Alive!

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, October 1972

DESPITE WHAT you may have heard of "skinhead rock" or "Seventies teddies", Slade is exactly the opposite of a gimmick band. You’ll not find synthesizers, ...

Stories: Stories

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, October 1972

STORIES IS a New York-based quartet which plays music with a strong kinship to British rock, yet lacks the ‘rank imitator’ brand of many a ...

Ed Sanders, The Fugs: Ed Sanders: Beer Cans on the Moon

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, October 1972

It could be that I’ve been spending too much time lost within the darkened pages of The Family lately, but more than anything else, this ...

Genesis: Nursery Cryme

Review by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, October 1972

THE COUNTRYSIDE COTTAGE in which (it says here) Genesis regrouped their creative energies must have had a lot of strange stuff coming out of the ...

John Denver: Rocky Mountain High

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1972

THERE HE IS on the screen of your color TV: blond, bespectacled, and peach-faced – the sight of him makes you want to adjust the ...

Boz Scaggs: My TIme

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1972

BOZ SCAGGS has one of the sweetest, most engaging voices around, and his recent albums have been on the sweet and friendly side, too. Records ...

Bobby Charles: Bobby Charles (Bearsville)

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, November 1972

BOBBY MADE THIS RECORD lying flat on his back, with his eyes closed and his dog licking his feet. He was tired, it had been ...

Patto: Roll 'em Smoke 'em, Put Another Line Out

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, November 1972

ALTHOUGH Patto has exhibited a penchant for eccentricity in their previous efforts, not even from a bunch of loonies such as they could one expect ...

Tim Hardin: Painted Heads

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1972

TIM HARDIN GOT so close to the top of the heap that it's hard to imagine how he could've blown it. ...

Uriah Heep: Demons and Wizards

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, November 1972

IT'S A STRANGE TIME. Formerly exciting rock groups have gone musically soft, if not well on the road to outright senility, making the moniker of ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott the Hoople: All the Young Dudes

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1972

Taking what does not belong to you is a crucial part of the process of creating rock & roll: Exploiting proven riffs, phrases and hooks, ...

Roy Harper: Stormcock in Heat, That's Roy Harper

Report and Interview by Jonh Ingham, Rolling Stone, December 1972

ROY HARPER WAS holidaying in Norway when word of the movie reached his management. It was his first holiday in three years, and all they ...

John Entwistle: John Entwhistle: Whistle Rymes

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, December 1972

"Thank you Mother Nature/ For the way you got things planned/ Don't ever change a thing/ I'm happy as I am." ...

Poco: A Good Feelin' to Know

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1972

I'VE JUST come home from seeing Poco play. They were terrific, significantly better than the last few times I heard them in concert. ...

Captain Beefheart Sings For Women

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, January 1973

NORTH HOLLYWOOD – Striding into the small but copiously equipped Warner Brothers recording studio like a bull dressed for a Chinatown parade, Captain Beefheart extends ...

Lou Reed: Transformer (RCA)

Review by Nick Tosches, Rolling Stone, January 1973

A REAL COCKTEASER, this album. That great cover: Lou and those burned-out eyes staring out in grim black and white beneath a haze of gold ...

The Incredible String Band, Lindisfarne, Pentangle, Plainsong, Richard Thompson, Steeleye Span: British Folk Rock: Robin Hood Rides A Chopper

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1973

Plainsong: In Search of Amelia Earhart (Elektra)Richard Thompson: Henry, the Human Fly (Warner Bros.)Steeleye Span: Below the Salt (Chrysalis)Incredible String Band: Earthspan (Reprise)Pentangle: Solomon's Seal ...

The Hollies: No Room For Solo Stars

Profile and Interview by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, January 1973

SANTA MONICA, Calif. – The Hollies, one of the original British invaders of the 1960s, are at yet another crossroads. Allan Clarke – one of ...

Big Star: No.1 Record

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1973

In the late Sixties, a Memphis teenager named Alex Chilton won moderate fame and fortune as the lead singer for a sometimes inspired, sometimes insipid ...

The Pretty Things: Pretty Things: Decade Of Dues Now Pays Off

Interview by Jonh Ingham, Rolling Stone, February 1973

THE ENGLISH BANDS that have survived since the first days of the British Invasion can be counted on the fingers of one hand. The Stones, ...

Slade: Steamroller Rock Knocks 'Em Flat

Profile and Interview by Jonh Ingham, Rolling Stone, February 1973

LONDON – Noddy gets the fans shouting, clapping, stomping, throwing their bras and knickers up on stage. Dave looks inhuman, silver from head to toe, ...

The Wackers: Shredder

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, February 1973

"Dylan is old/The Stones are cold/The Beatles are gone/ And it's making me yawn..." ...

Richie Havens: On Stage

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, February 1973

The question of motion has developed into a trap of sorts since our entertainers became artists. Artists must continually grow and evolve, but invariably draw ...

Stone The Crows: Ontinuous Performance

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, February 1973

STONE THE CROWS are hardly a well-known band here. Whether this is due to the hard heart, but quite undeservedly so, of radio programmers or ...

Doug Sahm: Doug Sahm and Band

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, March 1973

THEY DON'T SAY so on the jacket, but this is The Doug Sahm Showcase, featuring the former leader of the Sir Douglas Quintet paying homage ...

Free: Heartbreaker

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1973

FREE IS AN ENGLISH quartet that toured with Blind Faith, had a big hit single, was hailed by the British press as the new Rolling ...

Gram Parsons: GP

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1973

GRAM PARSONS is an artist with a vision as unique and personal as those of Jagger-Richard, Ray Davies, or any of the other celebrated figures. ...

Slade: Slayed?

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, March 1973

ON THEIR HOME continent, Slade are virtually indestructible: singles launched like tank mortars into the Euro-Top Ten at selected intervals, live appearances turned to massive ...

Joe South: A New, Un-Slick Joe South: A Look Inside

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, March 1973

AT ONE OF Joe South’s infrequent live shows, in some small place in Georgia a year or so back, he wasn’t getting the response he ...

The Belmonts, Dion: Dion & the Belmonts: Reunion; The Belmonts: Cigars, Acapella, Candy; Dion's Greatest Hits

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, March 1973

DION WAS the original punk. Stand him up next to his contemporary male teen idols – Frankie Avalon, Fabian, Bobby Vee, Brian Hyland, Bobby Rydell, ...

Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show: Dr. Hook: Sloppy Seconds

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, March 1973

IF YOU LOOK at the pictures and read the stories, you’ll have guessed that Dr. Hook is a bunch of lascivious layabouts dedicated to carrying ...

Grin: All Out

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1973

IN HIS WRITING, Grin leader Nils Lofgren shows a special affection for cowboy songs (not the actual music of the old West, but original tunes ...

The Ronettes Return to the Stage: Teenage Girls Forever

Profile and Interview by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, March 1973

FABIEN IS nervous. Not quite shaking in his boots, but enough so that his timing is off, lost in phrases that go nowhere despite the ...

Little Feat: Dixie Chicken

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1973

LIKE THEIR much more famous cousins, the Rolling Stones and Van Morrison, Little Feat are eclectic in a vertical rather than a horizontal way. They ...

The Byrds: The Best of the Byrds (Greatest Hits, Volume II)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1973

IF YOU WERE asked to put together an anthology album of one of the longest-lived, most productive rock groups ever, and you had the total ...

Jimmy Cliff et al: The Harder They Come

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, April 1973

THE REGGAE GROUNDSWELL that cups Jamaica's potential as a pop force has been heralded for many moons now, yet despite several breech-opening successes from a ...

Tammy Wynette, Toni and Terry: Tammy Wynette/Toni & Terry albums

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, April 1973

Toni and Terry: Cross CountryTammy Wynette: My Man ...

Grateful Dead: The Grateful Dead on Long Island

Live Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, April 1973

IT HAD TO HAPPEN: even the Dead have gone glitter. Resplendently suave in Nudie-type sequined suits, the group appeared on the stage of this comfortably-sized ...

The Hollies: Romany

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, April 1973

OF THE FEW groups who have survived since 1963, the Hollies sound fresher and more up-to-date than anyone, with the possible exception of the Beach ...

Andy Bown: Sweet William

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, May 1973

ANDY BOWN is a very clever fellow capable of producing much musical bliss, but seems to have fallen victim to many of the ills that ...

Beck, Bogert and Appice: The Felt Forum, NY

Live Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, May 1973

JEFF BECK HAS had his ups and downs over the past several years, not the least of which was a disastrous appearance last summer on ...

Humble Pie: Eat It

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, May 1973

HUMBLE PIE have always been a changing band, mutating from a Great Hardrocker (As Safe As Yesterday Is) to soft rock (Town & Country), and ...

Iggy Pop, The Stooges: Iggy Pop: Raw Power

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, May 1973

THE IG. Nobody does it better, nobody does it worse, nobody does it, period. Others tiptoe around the edges, make little running starts and half-hearted ...

Procol Harum: Grand Hotel

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1973

YOU CAN'T DENY Procol Harum their important place in rock's scheme of things. They were the first to bring together the energy and mood of ...

Doobie Brothers: The Doobie Brothers: The Captain And Me

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1973

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS are a mainstream rock band with a few crucial limitations and a knack of making good records despite their flaws. Their big ...

Deep Purple: Made In Japan

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, May 1973

DEEP PURPLE have had a rough time gaining and retaining the status of being Kings of the Heavy Metal Set, and with the release of ...

Focus: How to Make It Without Playing Top 40

Interview by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, May 1973

LOS ANGELES – "'Hocus Pocus' was done as a parody of rock," said Thijs van Leer, founder of Focus, commenting on his group's hit record. ...

Link Wray: Be What You Want To

Review by Wayne Robins, Rolling Stone, May 1973

LINK WRAY, father of chicken-shack recording, is back with his second album since emerging from the dim glint of rock history. Be What You Want ...

Pink Floyd: The Dark Side Of The Moon

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, May 1973

ONE OF BRITAIN'S most successful and long lived avant-garde rock bands, Pink Floyd emerged relatively unsullied from the mire of mid-'60s British psychedelic music as ...

Stealers Wheel: Stealers Wheel

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1973

YOU'VE PROBABLY discovered by now that ‘Stuck in the Middle with You’, the single you thought was the best Dylan record since 1966, is actually ...

Bloodstone: Natural High

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, June 1973

THE MORE I listen, the less I understand. A year ago Bloodstone was just one of any number of black groups who could excite a ...

Flo & Eddie: Flo and Eddie: Flo and Eddie

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1973

Flo & Eddie's second album is a much more complex undertaking than their first and for the most part it succeeds admirably. Where Kaylan and ...

Nicky Hopkins: The Tin Man Was a Dreamer

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1973

NICKY HOPKINS has gone into his first solo project in as careful and organized a manner as he goes into the studio to work on ...

Yes: Yessongs (Atlantic)

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, June 1973

YES SUFFERS from having too many diverse talents for one group to handle. The differing musical styles of the five musicians cannot easily be integrated ...

J. Geils Band: J Geils Band: Bloodshot

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1973

During the last two years, Boston's J. Geils Band has built itself a national reputation as a tight, energetic, popular and extremely good-humored touring band. ...

Spooky Tooth: You Broke My Heart So I Busted Your Jaw

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, June 1973

SPOOKY TOOTH HAS suffered from every misfortune that can cross the path of a rock & roll band — among them, changing record labels, arrested ...

Manassas: Stephen Stills and Manassas: Down The Road

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, June 1973

THE PACKAGING of a person's pain is a sticky subject for criticism. It feels uncouth to suggest the suffering should be more graceful. ...

Terry Reid: River

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1973

IT'S BEEN three-and-a-half years since Terry Reid released his last album. At the time he looked like an emerging talent, with extraordinary voice, wild and ...

Ellie Greenwich: Let It Be Written Let It Be Sung

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, July 1973

A NEW ELLIE GREENWICH album won't provoke Pavlovian ecstasy among the masses, but the news will intrigue a certain hard corps of faithful girl-group fanatics. ...

John Kay: My Sportin' Life

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1973

FROM THE VANTAGE point of 1968, that new tough-guy band called Steppenwolf had great prospects. ...

Paul McCartney: Red Rose Speedway

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, July 1973

WHEN PAUL MCCARTNEY's television special was aired several weeks ago, one of the ostensible aims was to provide a semi-biographical glimpse of the inner man, ...

Blue Ash: No More, No Less

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, July 1973

SINCE 1968 and the ascension of Cream and Hendrix to godhead status, rock has been ruled by tedious variations on their initial improvisatory explorations. ...

Heads Hands and Feet: Old Soldiers Never Die

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, July 1973

SOME OF ENGLAND'S finest ex-sessionmen, Heads Hands & Feet, have been soaking up America's finest as their influences, backing up Jerry Lee Lewis, Jackson Browne, ...

McGuinness Flint: Lo & Behold

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, July 1973

JIMI HENDRIX, Jeff Beck, the Byrds, Blue Ash...it seems that everyone in the world has taken a Bob Dylan song to great heights at one ...

Speedy Keen: Previous Convictions

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1973

Knockabout drummer John "Speedy" Keen was rescued from oblivion by a perceptive Peter Townshend, who saw in Mr. Keen an offbeat but potentially compelling talent. ...

Albert Hammond: The Free Electric Band

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, August 1973

ALBERT HAMMOND makes pure pop music and although ‘It Never Rains in California’ was merely annoying, ‘The Free Electric Band’ was a giant step forward. ...

Bonnie Bramlett: Sweet Bonnie Bramlett

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1973

Right after switching labels, from Atlantic (which considered the increasingly temperamental pair more trouble than they were worth) to Columbia, the Bramletts separated. The expected ...

Leon Russell: Ontario Motor Speedway

Live Review by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, August 1973

"SURE, WE'D LIKE this to be another Watkins Glen," laughed publicist Gary Stromberg, as the blistering sun crept slowly into the sky over the San ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott: No Success like Failure

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1973

WHAT AN ARRAY of weapons this band has: awesome firepower, an ever-increasing depth of expression, timely themes and an artistic way of mixing qualities on ...

Jimmy Cliff: Unlimited and Wonderful World, Beautiful People

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, September 1973

PUT THE NEEDLE on Jimmy Cliff's Unlimited, and the grooves writhe like a poised snake, the record grows hot with anger, and the air fills ...

Keef Hartley: Lancashire Hustler

Review by Jon Tiven, Rolling Stone, September 1973

KEEF HARTLEY'S a strange one, a functional drummer who, by way of his Mayall/Artwoods background, has managed to hang in there. ...

Stevie Wonder: Innervisions

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, September 1973

THE GREENING OF MOTOWN continues apace, with performers who once flourished under the company's autocratic guidelines (the Four Tops, Gladys Knight) seeking success elsewhere while ...

Allman Brothers Band: The Allman Brothers Band: Brothers and Sisters

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1973

THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND's magic has always existed mainly on the concert stage, where it can engage its audience casually and cumulatively. The band's image, ...

Allman Brothers Band: The Allman Brothers Band: Brothers And Sisters

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1973

The Allman Brothers Band's magic has always existed mainly on the concert stage, where it can engage its audience casually and cumulatively. ...

Elton John at the Hollywood Bowl - July 1973

Live Review by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, October 1973

THE HOUSE LIGHTS dimmed and a lonely spot picked out a single figure onstage. ...

The Raspberries: Side 3

Review by Metal Mike Saunders, Rolling Stone, October 1973

SINCE THEIR last time out, the Raspberries must have heard Blue Ash, or some vaguely threatening noises from the other side of Ohio, because a ...

Eric Clapton: Rainbow Concert

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1973

In a form in which individual instrumental feats are often self-indulgent and superfluous, Eric Clapton's music remains an anomaly. His greatest guitar playing has been ...

Gilbert O'Sullivan: Avery Fisher Hall, NYC

Live Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, October 1973

"TO GILBERT," READ the note attached to a plastic baby elephant presented by a squealing child fan in the front rows: "I think you're cute." ...

Matthew Fisher: Journey's End

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1973

FROM THE ALBUM title and Fisher's sensitive-looking cover portrait, you might expect the first solo LP of the former Procol Harum organist to be unbearably ...

Procol Harum at the Hollywood Bowl, September 1973

Live Review by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, October 1973

LOUSY sound systems and poor concerts are not a rarity these days, even for big name attractions like Neil Young or America, but when the ...

America: What This Band Needs Is a Hat Trick

Profile and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, November 1973

LOS ANGELES – To the crowd at the Hollywood Bowl, America could do – and did – no wrong. But to America, the concert was ...

Blue: Blue

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1973

SOME of the best recordings by the new generation of song-based groups have dealt overtly with Beatles music, the idea being that if you can't ...

Isis: Eight-Piece, All-Woman Band in Musical No-Man's Land

Report and Interview by Glenn O'Brien, Rolling Stone, November 1973

NEW YORK – An all-woman rock band, one that really cooks, seems to be both a contradiction in terms and a lousy pun. They've come ...

The Rolling Stones: Goat's Head Soup

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1973

HISTORY HAS PROVEN it unwise to jump to conclusions about Rolling Stones albums. At first Sticky Fingers seemed merely a statement of doper hipness on ...

10cc: 10cc

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, November 1973

A NEW STRAIN of music has been developing of late, unheralded except by those who delight in new studio techniques applied in loving parody to ...

Don Covay: Super Dude #1

Review by Charlie Gillett, Rolling Stone, November 1973

Super Dude? It sounds like this year's version of Muddy Waters' 'Hoochie Coochie Man' or Pickett's 'Midnight Mover' but where those men defined love as ...

Gerry Rafferty: Can I Have My Money Back?

Review by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, November 1973

Gerry Rafferty paid his dues playing bass in countless rock bands before joining up with fellow Scot Billy Connolly in a mildly successful affair called ...

J. Geils Band: Long Beach Arena, Long Beach CA

Live Review by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, November 1973

"HOPE YOU GUYS have tickets for tonight's show," advised the cop as we hurried for the Arena entrance. We nodded our assent, smiled and kept ...

Rick Derringer: All-American Boy

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, December 1973

THE OLD LITANY of the man with the cigar ("C'mere kid I'm gone make you a star") has been recited so often that it might ...

David Bowie: Pinups

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, December 1973

WITH EVERYONE from the Band to Don McLean doing oldies albums, the Who revisiting the Mod era, and David Bowie's guitarist Mick Ronson's obvious brilliance ...

Rick Derringer: A Real Mccoy

Interview by Glenn O'Brien, Rolling Stone, December 1973

NEW YORK – Elizabeth Derringer is married to Rick Derringer. Rick Derringer is a rock star. He has been since he was the 15-year-old guitarist ...

Steve Miller: The Steve Miller Band: The Joker (Capitol)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1973

STEVE MILLER is responsible for three of the best and one of the worst albums I own. ...

The Who: Quadrophenia

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, December 1973

Quadrophenia is the Who at their most symmetrical, their most cinematic, ultimately their most maddening. Captained by Pete Townshend, they have put together a beautifully ...

Neil Young: Time Fades Away

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1974

THIS ALBUM may do for Neil Young's declining image what Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid did for Dylan's. But like Dylan's much-maligned movie soundtrack ...

The Band: Moondog Matinee

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, January 1974

UNDER NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES this would be a fairly disappointing album for the Band, coming as it does on the year-old heels of a live set ...

Alice Cooper: Muscle Of Love

Review by Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone, January 1974

The Alice Cooper phenomenon, which began with the chart entry of "I'm Eighteen," rose to diabolical heights with Killer and School's Out and extravaganzaed in ...

Dave Mason: It's Like You Never Left

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1974

THAT FIRST AUTHENTIC follow-up to Alone Together finally exists. But while his skills as a musician are as noticeable as before, Dave Mason seems to ...

Badfinger: Ass (Apple)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1974

THE ALBUM TITLE is the band's reference to themselves as unwitting followers of some enticing but unrealizable dream, That dream may have been Badfinger's expectations ...

Electric Light Orchestra: On the Third Day

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, January 1974

IF YOU LIKED ELO II for its weavings of familiar classical motifs through lengthy songs, On the Third Day will both please and disappoint you. ...

Billy Cobham, Mahavishnu Orchestra: On Leave From Mahavishnu, Drummer Billy Cobham Gets His Chance: Solo

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, January 1974

LOS ANGELES – "I never felt my music was ever really wanted by the Mahavishnu Orchestra," complained drummer Billy Cobham. "I tried having them use ...

Stealers Wheel: Ferguslie Park

Review by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, January 1974

WITH FERGUSLIE PARK, Gerry Rafferty and Joe Egan are back as Stealers Wheel. Considering that the duo is unencumbered by the band's former members (with ...

The Kinks: Preservation Act 1

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, February 1974

THE KINKS traditionally stand as preservers of the eternal verities of their Village Green, fighting off the depredations of predatory capitalists in their dapper demolition ...

Grin: Gone Crazy

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, February 1974

NILS LOFGREN, a superb songwriter, possesses an appealing vocal style and is a fine guitarist. On the strength first three albums it’s unbelievable that he ...

Canned Heat: One More River To Cross

Review by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, February 1974

ONE WOULD EXPECT that with its new label, Atlantic, and rejuvenated line-up (which includes Bob Hite, vocals; Henry Vestine, guitar; Fito de la Pareda, drums; ...

Fleetwood Mac Flak: Manager Takes Name, Not Members, On Tour

Report by Loraine Alterman, Rolling Stone, February 1974

And then there were none... ...

Stories: Ian Lloyd & Stories: Traveling Underground

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1974

STORIES COPED with the loss of founder Michael Brown (a fine keyboard player and songwriter who also led the Left Banke) by recording 'Brother Louie', ...

Ozark Mountain Daredevils: The Cosmic Corncobs Go North

Profile and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, February 1974

LOS ANGELES – Bolivar, Missouri, has 5000 citizens and more than a hundred churches, Bible schools and theological colleges full of well-scrubbed Christian boys and ...

Dave Mason: No More Traffic Jams

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, March 1974

LOS ANGELES – The reporter from the Free Press had one more question for Dave Mason after the interview at his road manager's house in ...

Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen: Live from Deep in the Heart of Texas

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, March 1974

COMMANDER Cody’s fourth and most successful album proves the group can incite any audience to dance, drink and have fun. ...

Genesis: Short on Hair, Long on Gimmicks

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, March 1974

LOS ANGELES – Peter Gabriel's five o'clock shadow tints not only cheeks and chin but the shaved patch of flesh which cuts up from the ...

Graham Nash: Tales Behind Wild Tales

Interview by Loraine Alterman, Rolling Stone, March 1974

NEW YORK – In the living room of a moss-green suite at the Plaza Hotel, Graham Nash sits at the piano with an harmonica braced ...

Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons: Gram Parsons with Emmylou Harris: Grievous Angel

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1974

MICK JAGGER wrote 'Wild Horses' for and about the late Gram Parsons and its chorus describes the paradox that fueled Parsons’ life and vision. '...Wild ...

Alvin Lee: On The Road To Freedom

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1974

TWO OFTEN UNPERSUASIVE musicians have combined to make an album better than any of their past work. Alvin Lee and Mylon LeFevre may have always ...

John Denver: John Denver's Greatest Hits

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1974

JOHN DENVER has a strong and tuneful tenor, a smilingly ingenuous persona both vocally and visually and a sense of purpose to his writing and ...

Deep Purple: Burn

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, April 1974

DEEP PURPLE'S first album since last year's departure of vocalist Ian Gillan and bassist/composer Roger Glover is a passable but disappointing effort. ...

Foghat: Energized

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, April 1974

THE BIGGEST FACTOR preventing the spread of glitter rock in America is the persistent popularity of blues, particularly in the form of its degenerate offspring, ...

Nazareth: Loud 'n' Proud

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, May 1974

ON THEIR SECOND A&M album, this Scottish group with folk roots continue on their heavy electric course, guided by producer Roger Glover (of Deep Purple ...

Terry Melcher: Surf's Up! Terry Melcher's Nightmare Is Over

Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, May 1974

LOS ANGELES – Terry Melcher, a consistent professional, has participated in scores of hits with artists as diverse as Frankie Laine and the Byrds. Seven ...

Leo Sayer: The Little Clown

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, May 1974

LOS ANGELES – The rain that was falling relentlessly on the tropical fantasyland that surrounds the Beverly Hills Hotel was giving Leo Sayer "a nasty ...

Peter Frampton: Something's Happening

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, May 1974

PETER FRAMPTON has become a highly stylized performer. The songs on his new album sound much the same as the material on two earlier solo ...

Steely Dan: Pretzel Logic

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1974

STEELY DAN is the most improbable hit-singles band to emerge in ages. On its three albums, the group has developed an impressionistic approach to rock ...

Carly Simon, James Taylor: James Taylor: Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee

Live Review by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, June 1974

Magic in Milwaukee ...

Suzi Quatro: Suzi Quatro

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, June 1974

WHILE AMERICAN AUDIENCES continue to boogie as though it were still 1968, London has been overrun by pop maniacs, raising the ghost of Carnaby Street ...

Terry Melcher: Terry Melcher

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1974

THIS ALBUM is definitely not for everyone. Terry Melcher, once the producer of the Byrds and Paul Revere and the Raiders, has released an eccentric ...

Led Zeppelin: Swan Song Is a Beginning

Report and Interview by Loraine Alterman, Rolling Stone, June 1974

NEW YORK — "The name Led Zeppelin means a failure," explains lead singer Robert Plant, "and Swan Song means a last gasp — so why ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott the Hoople: Rock on Broadway

Report and Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, June 1974

NEW YORK — The hall had long since emptied. The only light on the stage was cast by a bare light bulb atop a scrawny ...

The Guess Who: Road Food

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1974

DISMISSED by snobbish critics as a clockwork singles machine, the Guess Who have continued selling albums and filling concert halls even after the hits stopped ...

New York Dolls: The New York Dolls: Too Much Too Soon

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, June 1974

Lotta Goin' Nowhere Goin' On ...

Blue Swede: Grunting a Feeling

Report and Interview by Harold Bronson, Rolling Stone, July 1974

LOS ANGELES – Oohka Chucka! Oohka Oohka Oohka Chucka! – a jungle war cry gives way suddenly to a hardy, supper-club crooner romanticizing an old ...

Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids: Flash Cadillac: There's No Face like Chrome

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, July 1974

FLASH CADILLAC & the Continental Kids have been identified with a stale spate of revivalist Fifties bands – even though their live performances prove they ...

The Carpenters: Up From Downey

Profile and Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, July 1974

KAREN CARPENTER, the solo singing half of a brother and sister musical duo that has sold over 25 million records world-wide, has classic "good looks" ...

Ducks Deluxe: Ducks Deluxe

Review by Greg Shaw, Rolling Stone, July 1974

A FEW YEARS AGO, some English pubs began presenting live bands as a free service to their patrons. Since there have never been enough outlets ...

Gil Evans, Jimi Hendrix: Gil Evans: Jazzing Up Jimi

Interview by Ian Dove, Rolling Stone, July 1974

Evans gave Hendrix's music an orchestral workout. ...

Eric Clapton: The Rolling Stone Interview: Eric Clapton

Interview by Steve Turner, Rolling Stone, July 1974

LONDON — Robert Stigwood, his manager, put it about as simply and as playfully as it could be put, after a celebration party in April: ...

War: A Street Rod on the Boulevard of Soul

Report and Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, July 1974

"SOMETIMES I TELL myself: I'm B.B. Dickerson and I'm in War so I'm going to pull up in front of the Continental Hyatt House in ...

Brownsville Station: School Punks

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, August 1974

THIS IS AN IMPORTANT album. It's a good album, too, but even if it were terrible, it would still be important. ...

Golden Earring: Light Metal

Report and Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, August 1974

LOS ANGELES – If Golden Earring, the perseverant Dutch quartet, turns out to be as good as the Ray Milland/Marlene Dietrich WWII film whose title ...

Maria Muldaur

Report and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, August 1974

THE AUDIENCE is expectant, the music strident, the voice rich and full-throated and sensuous. It's San Diego, the first stop on Maria Muldaur's 30-day road ...

Joni Mitchell, Tom Scott: Tom Scott: Joni's Spark

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, August 1974

LOS ANGELES – Mention the name Tom Scott in jazz circles and recognition is immediate: The 25-year-old horn-playing prodigy from Southern California is well known ...

John Stewart: The Phoenix Concerts (RCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1974

THE MERE SOUND of John Stewart’s tremulous voice is enough to conjure up the ghost of an antique, heroic America. Stewart’s songs — 16 of ...

Bad Company: Paul Rodgers's Bad Company

Interview by Steven Rosen, Rolling Stone, August 1974

LOS ANGELES – Cub Scout shirt unbuttoned, face unshaven, hair uncombed, Paul Rodgers sits tensely in a corner armchair. ...

Ray Manzarek Opens a New Door: Jazz

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, August 1974

CHICAGO – "See that guy," Jim Morrison once remarked, pointing to Ray Manzarek: "He is the Doors." Although Morrison received all the attention, it was ...

ABBA: Waterloo

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, August 1974

Abba's emergence is one of the most cheering musical events in recent months. Just when the Top 40 was plumbing hitherto-unfathomable, moribund depths, along came ...

Bad Company: Bad Company

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1974

ON ITS FIRST album, Bad Company – led by former Free singer Paul Rodgers and original Mott the Hoople guitarist Mick Ralphs – resembles Free ...

The Band, Bob Dylan: Bob Dylan/The Band: Before The Flood (Asylum)

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, August 1974

THROUGHOUT BOB DYLAN'S performances on this in-concert album there is evident an effort to match the material – nearly all from much earlier in his ...

John Lennon: Two Questions about Lennon

Report by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, August 1974

NEW YORK – John was wearing shades, his chestnut hair glistening in the fancy studio lights, big ones over his cars, sitting in a booth ...

Steeleye Span: Ye Olde Rocke & Rolle

Profile by Steve Turner, Rolling Stone, September 1974

CONSIDER STEELEYE SPAN – grounded firmly in traditional English folk music and trying to crack a largely American audience that has no background in, or ...

Fairport Convention, The Strawbs: The Strawbs: Hero and Heroine; Fairport Convention: Nine

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, September 1974

The Strawbs and Fairport Convention are conveniently linked by their past importance in modernizing the British folk scene (and their use, at different times, of ...

America: Holiday

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1974

MORE THAN any other group of the Seventies, America — in both its British and U.S. periods—has epitomized the stiff, soulless side of California pop. ...

Man: Rhinos, Winos & Lunatics

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1974

Man is a Welsh-based band with its heart in San Francisco–specifically, in the elongated and textured music of Quicksilver and the early Dead. Earlier versions ...

Average White Band: Average White Band (MCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1974

If it wasn’t apparent from its first album (on MCA), it is from the second: Scotland’s Average White Band is one of the best self-contained ...

David Bowie: Time For Another Ch-ch-change

Report and Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, October 1974

LOS ANGELES – David Bowie hadn't slept for 36 hours. He'd just gone through his rigorous show at the Universal Amphitheater for the fourth night ...

Jesse Winchester: Learn To Love It

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1974

ON JESSE WINCHESTER'S first two albums, Jesse Winchester and Third Down, 110 To Go, the fine balance struck between conviction and melodiousness, simplicity and eloquence ...

Minnie Riperton: S'Wonderlove

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, October 1974

LOS ANGELES – Along with many of the stars and hopefuls at Chicago's 1971 Black Expo, Minnie Riperton waited patiently backstage to approach the blind ...

The Raspberries: Starting Over

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, October 1974

THE RASPBERRIES have at last realized their potential. They've clearly become the premier synthesizers of Sixties pop influences, extant. Even more importantly, the end results ...

Traffic Lightens Up for American Tour

Report and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, October 1974

NEW YORK – Looking only slightly recovered from a two-day-old case of jet lag, Traffic drummer Jim Capaldi strutted into the Providence Civic Center dressing ...

Kiki Dee: Rocketing Along With Elton

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, November 1974

CHICAGO – The crowds gathering in 32 American cities over 44 dates between September 25th and December 3rd are there to see Elton John – ...

Ronnie Wood: I've Got My Own Album To Do

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1974

RON WOOD, whose role in the Faces has paralleled Keith Richard's function in the Rolling Stones, has put together what is less a solo album ...

Nektar: Germany's Nektar: They See the Light

Profile and Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, November 1974

ST. LOUIS – The light show, thinks Mick Brockett, is something that was prematurely abandoned by the rock world, and though he's reluctant to talk ...

The Rolling Stones: Making the Stones’ New Album

Profile and Interview by Steve Turner, Rolling Stone, December 1974

Twenty-one albums on, Keith Richard is back in Richmond, the Thameside London suburb where the Rolling Stones first played the local clubs 12 years ago. ...

Roger McGuinn: The Post-Flight Is Finally Solo

Report and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, December 1974

LOS ANGELES – A solitary figure in the Troubadour spotlight, Roger McGuinn swayed gently as he sang: "Hey Mr. D. do you want me to ...

Rufus: Rags To Rufus (ABC)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1974

RAGS TO RUFUS, the second LP from the pop group turned soul band, is most notable for lead singer Chaka Khan’s inspired performances. ...

Electric Light Orchestra: Roll Over Chuck Berry and Tell Beethoven the News

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, December 1974

SAN FRANCISCO – Jeff Lynne nods toward the sliding glass door, through which can be seen an in-progress high-rise which looms uncomfortably close to his ...

Robert Fripp: After King Crimson, The Apocalypse

Report and Interview by Ian Dove, Rolling Stone, December 1974

NEW YORK – After five short years, King Crimson is no more and the man who began and ended the group, Robert Fripp, is already ...

Louis Jordan: Louis Jordan

Retrospective and Interview by Michael Lydon, Rolling Stone, 1975

"DRINK SOME BEER and be of good cheer!" ...

Badfinger: Wish You Were Here

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1975

UP TO NOW, the big singles, 'Come and Get It', 'No Matter What', 'Day After Day', and especially 'Baby Blue' have provided the obvious high ...

Bruce Johnston

Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, January 1975

THAT BRUCE JOHNSTON should have chosen an old Beach Boys hit for the group California Music's first release on his (and Terry Melcher's) Equinox label, ...

Genesis: To Them, It's Only Rock & Role

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, January 1975

LONDON – Having recently sold England by the pound, Genesis and Atlantic Records now turn their attention to the United States, where the esteemed buck ...

Gil Scott-Heron: Survival Kits on Wax

Profile and Interview by Sheila Weller, Rolling Stone, January 1975

NEW YORK – At the age of 25, he has to his credit two published novels, one published collection of poetry and four albums of ...

Gladys Knight: I Feel a Song

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, January 1975

TWO YEARS AGO, while working for another magazine, I rejected a rambling interview between black poet Nikki Giovanni and singer Gladys Knight. The interview wasn't ...

Jefferson Starship: Dragon Fly

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1975

FOR SEVERAL YEARS, the nucleus of the Airplane/Starship has been struggling to hold together a concept that didn't seem workable in the first place. The ...

Electric Light Orchestra: The Electric Light Orchestra: Eldorado

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, January 1975

THE ELECTRIC LIGHT Orchestra has sometimes swamped itself in grandiose conceptions, and Eldorado (A Symphony) sounds like a prime opportunity to do it again. But ...

Tom Rush's Circle: Joni, James & Cows

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, January 1975

MANFRED, MASSACHUSETTS – James Taylor's nasal drawl crackled insistently across the telephone line from his Martha's Vineyard retreat. "I first heard Tom Rush about ten ...

Andy Fairweather Lowe: Andy Fairweather Low: Spider Jiving

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, January 1975

ANDY FAIRWEATHER LOW has one of the quirkiest and most distinctive voices in recent pop memory, and from the first bar of this topnotch debut ...

Love: Reel to Real

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, January 1975

ARTHUR LEE and Love have an albatross around their necks: their nearly perfect 1968 album, Forever Changes, a never equaled distillation of smooth pop and ...

Sparks: Instant Darlings

Profile and Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, January 1975

LOS ANGELES – It was several months ago in London that the disc jockey on Capitol Radio, BBC's commercial rival, was revealing the results of ...

Alvin Lee's Long Road To Freedom

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, February 1975

LONDON – Alvin Lee is on the road again, and this time he's not going home. ...

Arthur Lee: Love, Arthur Lee Style: More Changes

Interview by Steven Rosen, Rolling Stone, February 1975

LOS ANGELES – Not since the 1972 release of Vindicator has Arthur Lee been widely heard on record, that first polo project seemingly marking the ...

Billy Preston's Gospel Truths

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, February 1975

LOS ANGELES – "I've never asked anyone to help me or give me a break," declared Billy Preston adamantly. "Whatever I don't have now I ...

Jack Bruce: Out of the Storm

Review by Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, February 1975

JACK BRUCE WAS one of the most outstanding and at the same time least recognized talents to appear on the transatlantic rock scene in the ...

Loggins & Messina: There's Gold In The Middle Of The Road

Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, February 1975

THE RUSTIC HOUSE on Round Valley Drive in the hills of the San Fernando Valley is in one of those pockets of geography that provides ...

The Faces: Raunchy Faces Back on Tour

Report and Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, February 1975

LONDON – "We're playing as one now like our life depended on it," Rod Stewart announced, looking down eagerly at his game pie in a ...

Charlie Rich: The Depression, Country Music and Me

Essay by Al Aronowitz, Rolling Stone, February 1975

This sorrowful piece was sent to us, by third-class mail, by Al Aronowitz, pop columnist for the New York Post until the paper dropped him ...

Dan Fogelberg: Home Free At Last

Report and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, March 1975

LOS ANGELES - For Dan Fogelberg, 1974 ended on a note of modest triumph. Though 6,500 fans jammed the Shrine Auditorium to help the Eagles ...

B.T. Express: BT Express: Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1975

DO IT ('Til You're Satisfied) resembles George McCrae's Rock Your Baby album in that it finds a persistent groove and stays with it unflaggingly from ...

Grand Funk Railroad: All The Girls In The World Beware

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, March 1975

IT'S A MEASURE OF Grand Funk's less than overwhelming critical acceptance that the chief topic of interest for most reviewers has been the band's current ...

Hall & Oates: War Babies

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1975

AFTER RECORDING Abandoned Luncheonette, an often ingenious merger of white acoustic pop and Philly soul, Philadelphians Hall & Oates disavowed that style, switched producers (from ...

Emmylou Harris: EmmyLou Harris: Pieces of The Sky

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1975

WHEN THE BYRDS recorded Sweetheart of the Rodeo in 1968, the romance between country music and pop was still secret. Seven years later, both country ...

Little Feat: Giant Steps Across The Sea

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, April 1975

JACKSON BROWNE said that their founder was "the Orson Welles of rock & roll" and Jimmy Page has called them his "favorite American group." ...

The Pretty Things: New Pretty Things Get a Led Zep Uplift

Interview by Steve Turner, Rolling Stone, April 1975

LONDON – The Pretty Things were there at the beginning. Phil May, the band’s lead singer and only original member, followed Keith Richard out of ...

Joe Walsh: So What

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1975

As he's moved westward – from the East Coast to Ohio to Colorado to Los Angeles–Joe Walsh has assimilated one regional rock style after another. ...

Robin Trower's Unbroken Barricade: 'I'm Still in the Shadow of Jimi Hendrix'

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, April 1975

PORTLAND – Robin Trower finally emerges from the dressing room, which has remained locked for an ominously long time, and forces a smile. ...

Sparks: Propaganda

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, April 1975

ON THEIR NOW obscure Warner Bros.' albums Sparks's intriguing lyrics and immaculate conceptions were undermined by inadequate musical constructions. ...

Ace: Five-a-Side

Review by Wayne Robins, Rolling Stone, May 1975

FROM THE LOOK of its album cover, Ace is a band of five frustrated English football players who, like Rod Stewart, turned to music to ...

Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen: Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen (Warner Bros.)

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, May 1975

IN 1971, COMMANDER Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen, already a legend in such disparate climes as San Francisco and Detroit, finally reached a recording ...

Gordon Lightfoot: Cold on the Shoulder (Reprise)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

FOR A DECADE NOW, Gordon Lightfoot has been a neo-folk hero in Canada. His early records and performances were distinguished by a rugged romanticism that ...

Ian Hunter: Not the Hoople

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, May 1975

LONDON – "Fucking tremendous," Ian Hunter mumbled into Mick Ronson's right ear as his first solo album blasted out of the speakers. The former leader ...

Mac Davis: All the Love in the World

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1975

HEREWITH, THE Legend of the Songpainter. ...

Queen: Sheer Heart Attack

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

TWO OF THe MOST liberated and ambitious of the "fun" oriented British bands beginning to make their mark in the States are the updated war-horses ...

Steely Dan: Katy Lied

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1975

STEELY DAN sound like a million dollars not only next to at least 26 of their coresidents of the Boss 30 when they're in it, ...

The Pretty Things: Silk Torpedo

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

THE PRETTY THINGS are from a different part of town. Once competitors with the Stones in the raunch-and-outrage genre, the Pretty Things began a progression ...

Eric Clapton: There's One In Every Crowd

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

Eric Clapton's sense of well-being is reiterated on There's One in Every Crowd, but on this album it seems less a cause for joy than ...

John Mayall's After-Hours Madness

Interview by Steven Rosen, Rolling Stone, May 1975

CINCINNATI – With the release of his latest album, New Year, New Band, New Company, 41-year-old John Mayall has logged 23 albums in just over ...

Ace Strong on ‘How Long’

Report and Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, June 1975

THOUGH IT SOUNDS like a song about a stale love affair, ‘How Long’ is the story of an English band struggling to stay together. ...

Bob Seger: Beautiful Loser

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1975

BOB SEGER is a superb songwriter and Midwestern rocker who's been ignored for far too long. He had a hit, 'Ramblin' Gamblin' Man' in 1968, ...

Doobie Brothers: One Guitarist On, One Guitarist Off

Report and Interview by Joel Selvin, Rolling Stone, June 1975

SAN FRANCISCO – Three years ago, the Doobie Brothers lived on food stamps in San Jose, playing at ramshackle area clubs for as little as ...

Jeff Beck: Blow By Blow

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, June 1975

JEFF BECK SEEMS finally to have figured out that his is not going to replace the great '60s group which bore his name and featured ...

Manhattan Transfer: Manhattan Transfer

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1975

ONLY THE MOST incorrigible boogie casualty could find the Manhattan Transfer less than quite uncommonly delightful onstage. ...

Pink Floyd: Los Angeles Sports Arena

Live Review by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, June 1975

Space Rock: Floydian Slip ...

10cc: The Original Soundtrack

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1975

10cc's Original Soundtrack is a fascinating record. Musically there's more going on than in ten Yes albums, yet it's generally as accessible as a straight ...

Chicago: Chicago VIII

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1975

WHILE IT'S DIFFICULT to picture anyone failing to be amused by the intentional ludicrousness of, say, dedicating an album to the revolution or making the ...

Kraftwerk: Autobahn

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1975

NOT TO TAKE anything away from Ralf, Florian, Klaus or even Wolfgang – who are probably real nice geezers once you get to know them ...

Lynyrd Skynyrd: Nuthin' Fancy

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1975

WITH THREE full-time electric guitarists, a piano player and a fireplug of a lead singer who looks like Robert Blake's Baretta in a hippie disguise, ...

Yes: Relayer and Yesterdays

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1975

WITH THEIR LAST five albums (including Relayer) reaching Top Five status, Yes are central to the new British Invasion. ...

Harry Nilsson: Duit On Mon Dei

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1975

HARRY NILSSON hasn't made a good album since '71's Nilsson Schmilsson, the recording that brought him the sales and critical esteem he'd deserved all along. ...

Blood Sweat & Tears Featuring David Clayton-Thomas: New City

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, July 1975

IN NEW CITY BS&TFDC-T have made an album that fans of everything from soul to easy listening to jazz to difficult listening to rock will ...

Carla Bley, Jack Bruce, Mick Taylor: Bruce and Taylor's Band of Misfits

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, July 1975

LONDON – "I had three choices: give up completely, find a backing group to play my songs mechanically, or become a sideman playing bass in ...

James Taylor: Gorilla

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1975

JAMES TAYLOR pretty much wrote the book for the singer/songwriters of the Seventies. That may be a dubious distinction but Taylor's early work, characterized by ...

The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band: Souther Hillman Furay: Trouble in Paradise

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1975

IN CONCERT LAST year, Richie Furay seemed bewildered, as if he'd suddenly found himself onstage not with his own band but rather with a bunch ...

Yvonne Elliman: Eric's Backup Lady

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, July 1975

LONDON – The driver was growing impatient. He had little over an hour to squeeze through rush-hour traffic and deposit Yvonne Elliman on a plane ...

Joan Baez: Diamonds and Rust

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, July 1975

LISTENING to this Joan Baez album – her first self-declaredly apolitical, decidedly commercial album since the days of folk rock – it is possible to ...

The Rolling Stones: The Stones Roll On: A Scare in Boston; Success in Toronto; A Slip in New York

Report by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, July 1975

NEW YORK — The scariest moment came in Boston, when overzealous fans grabbed the writhing, confetti-spitting dragon that appears at the end of 'Jumpin' Jack ...

Peter Frampton: Saved by the Power of Love

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, August 1975

LOS ANGELES – Peter Frampton's fine-boned, clear-eyed and unlined face gives little hint of the eight years which have elapsed since the singer/guitarist, now 25, ...

Spirit: Spirit of '76

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

FROM ITS CONCEPTION to its sonics, Spirit of '76 is this year's eccentric's eccentric record, and Randy California (last heard from as "Kapt. Kopter" on ...

The Beau Brummels: The Beau Brummels

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

I BOUGHT MY first two Sixties rock & roll albums, the Byrds' Mr. Tambourine Man and the debut LP of the Beau Brummels, at a ...

Neil Young: Tonight's The Night

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, August 1975

"I'm sorry. You don't know these people. This means nothing to you." — Neil Young, in the liner notes ...

Roger McGuinn, Stephen Stills: Steven Stills, Roger McGuinn & Band Albums

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

Roger McGuinn: Roger McGuinn & Band (Columbia)Stephen Stills: Stills (Columbia) ...

Three Dog Night: Coming Down Your Way

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

THIS ALBUM clearly marks the demise of Three Dog Night, actually if not yet officially. It's the latest and worst in a series of terribly ...

Bob Marley & the Wailers: An Herbal Meditation with Bob Marley

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, September 1975

LOS ANGELES – This Bible is not the arcane, apocryphal version you might expect to find in the possession of these mysterious Rastas, but a ...

Roger Daltrey, The Who: Roger Daltrey: What the Who's Been Doing

Interview by Barbara Charone, Rolling Stone, September 1975

LONDON – "I don't think Tommy held the band back – it's just that nobody wanted to listen to what [else] we were doing. Who's ...

Fleetwood Mac: Fleetwood Mac

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1975

NOT ONLY IS Fleetwood Mac no longer blues oriented, it isn't even really British: The two newest members, Lindsey Buckingham (guitar and vocals) and Stevie ...

Gary Stewart: You're Not the Woman You Used to Be

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, September 1975

THIS COLLECTION OF old singles was released to scoop up some of the financial overflow from country music's current hottest new item. ...

Millie Jackson: Still Caught Up

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, September 1975

AND STILL GETTIN' it while the get-tin' is still good. Those who enjoyed Caught Up, Millie Jackson's last song cycle, won't be disappointed by this ...

Slade: Slade in Flame

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, September 1975

POOR SLADE. The biggest band in England for a while and in the States they couldn't get arrested. Last time out, they toned down and ...

Procol Harum: Procol's Ninth

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1975

PROCOL HARUM, down to delusions of grandeur after losing key members (like Robin Trower and Matthew Fisher) and running desperately low on ideas has been ...

The Troggs: The Troggs

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, October 1975

NOT SINCE MARC Bolan noshed himself into semiretirement have our pre-nursery-school age friends been given product on which they could so effortlessly get off as ...

Crosby and Nash: More Kick-Ass Than Anyone Expects

Interview by Cameron Crowe, Rolling Stone, October 1975

THANKS TO A band featuring such polished musicians as Danny 'Kootch' Kortchmar (guitar), David Lindley (fiddle and Hawaiian steel guitar), Craig Doerge (keyboards), Lee Sklar ...

Flo & Eddie: Illegal, Immoral and Fattening

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, October 1975

INSIDIOUS. Here we have the mainspring of the Turtles, Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan, with an album that contains two songs (‘Rebecca’ and ‘Let Me ...

Hall & Oates: Daryl Hall and John Oates

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, October 1975

After three albums Daryl Hall and John Oates finally have a clear-cut style. This is Hall & Oates's Wild Honey: lean, basic and more concerned ...

John Fogerty: John Fogerty

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1975

JOHN FOGERTY singlehandedly prepares records that are virtually perfect in execution as well as conception: brilliantly concise self-expression, captivating and broad-based radio music. Though he ...

Sam & Dave: Sam & Dave: Back At' Cha!

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, November 1975

IF ANYTHING SYMBOLIZES the decline of the Stax Records era (recently brought to a probable close with the indictment of president Al Bell for bank ...

Grand Funk Railroad: Caught In The Act (Capitol)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, November 1975

IF GRAND FUNK was once a publicist’s tool, this new live album shows the extent to which they have become a producer’s tool. If once ...

Pink Floyd: Wish You Were Here

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, November 1975

WITHOUT PINK FLOYD we would not have the European sci-fi multitudes (Hawkwind, Can, Amon Duul II and all their little friends) to kick around. They ...

The Faces, Rod Stewart: Rod Stewart Faces the American Dream

Report and Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, November 1975

BY SUNDOWN the 55,000 people packed into the Los Angeles Angels' Anaheim Stadium for this "sunshine festival" have stolidly endured six hours of a rather ...

The Amazing Rhythm Aces: Stacked Deck

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1975

‘THIRD RATE Romance’, an intriguing mystery on Jesse Winchester's '74 album, Learn to Love It, is no longer mysterious – the song's become a well-deserved ...

Bonnie Raitt: Home Plate

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, December 1975

DESPITE ITS UNEVENNESS, this is a vast improvement over Street Lights and accomplishes much of what that LP set out to do in the first ...

The Carpenters, Neil Sedaka: Neil Sedaka: Second Stairway To Heaven

Report and Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, December 1975

AWAY FROM the Vegas casino clatter, inside the Riviera Hotel's now empty Versailles Room, onstage, seated at a piano is a petite, energetic man who ...

Betty Davis: Nasty Gal

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1975

ON HER FIRST two albums, Betty Davis staked out a peculiar brand of kinky, tongue-in-cheek funk that garnered her a cult following in Philadelphia and ...

Eric Carmen: Eric Carmen

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, December 1975

AS THE FORMER lead singer of the Raspberries, a group whose misadventures prevented them from ever seeing sales figures that compared equitably with their true ...

Leon Redbone: On The Track

Review by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, December 1975

LEON REDBONE, according to the record jacket of his first album, is not to be confused or associated with the Epic recording artists Redbone. Hardly. ...

Simon & Garfunkel Reunite: It's Paul, But Is It Art?

Report and Interview by Wayne Robins, Rolling Stone, December 1975

NEW YORK – Comedian Richard Belzer was warming up the studio audience for NBC's Saturday Night program, October 18th. This, he was saying, was an ...

David Ruffin: Who I Am

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, January 1976

THIS IS AN encouraging album. After a celebrated re-signing with Motown last year, the ponderous Norman Whitfield-produced Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to ...

Flo & Eddie Post-Turtles: So Snappy Together

Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, January 1976

ON THE ROAD IN INDIANA – "Shit," laments Howard Kaylan (Eddie), whose long silver hair and gray beard give him the appearance of a lecherous ...

Patti Smith: Her Horses Got Wings, They Can Fly

Profile and Interview by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, January 1976

Factory Girl, Coal Stove Visionary, Scion of Rimbaud and the Ronettes, Patti Smith Now Challenges the Assembly Line of Rock & Roll ...

Roxy Music: Siren

Review by Simon Frith, Rolling Stone, January 1976

THERE USED TO be this ad (in the Fifties, I suppose) for a cigarette: YOU'RE NEVER ALONE WITH A STRAND! A guy alone in the ...

Neil Young and Crazy Horse: Zuma

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1976

"It's another rock & roll album. A lot of instrumental things... it's about the Incas and the Aztecs. It takes on another personality. It's like ...

Ann Peebles: Tellin' It

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, January 1976

ONCE A CONSISTENT R&B hit-maker, Ann Peebles's output has seen a precipitous drop in both the vitality of her music and the sales of her ...

Earth Wind and Fire: Signs Rise for Shining Stars

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, January 1976

LOS ANGELES – "Music is a sacred thing and we take it very seriously," Earth Wind & Fire founder/percussionist Maurice White offers during a rehearsal ...

The Faces, The Rolling Stones: Faces Break Up – Wood a Stone?

Report by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, January 1976

LOS ANGELES – After a six-year association, Rod Stewart is leaving the Faces. The news was revealed at a London press conference called by Stewart ...

Edgar Winter, Johnny Winter: Johnny and Edgar Winter: Two Hazy Shades of Winter

Report and Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, January 1976

OAKLAND – "My band's a dictatorship and Edgar's is a democracy," Johnny Winter blurted out through the hotel-room haze after playing the last of three ...

The Cate Brothers: Cate Brothers

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1976

TEN YEARS AGO, Earl and Ernie Cate were playing the same Arkansas bars as Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks. While the Hawks have moved on ...

Van Dyke Parks: The Clang of the Yankee Reaper

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, January 1976

In rootless Southern California, the only cultural traditions are those which you create for yourself. Maybe that's why Van Dyke Parks is much beloved of ...

Robert Palmer: Pressure Drop

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1976

BRITISHER Robert Palmer is another marcher in the growing column of white folks who prefer playing it greasy and getting down (notable recent examples: Bowie, ...

Tommy Bolin

Interview by David Rensin, Rolling Stone, February 1976

ON THE COVER of his first solo album, Teaser, Tommy Bolin's face is creased into a laugh that couples angelic delight and demonic perversity. Considering ...

Queen: Four Queens Beat Opera Flush

Report and Interview by Steve Turner, Rolling Stone, March 1976

Cashing In on a Rock Rhapsody ...

The Osmonds: The Family Plan Of The Latter-Day Osmonds

Profile and Interview by Tom Nolan, Rolling Stone, March 1976

The Wizards who Live in the Land of OsWorship their God and Obey the LawsWear Ice Cream Suits without Bulges or FlawsAnd Smile with the ...

Junior Walker & The Allstars: Junior Walker and the All-Stars: Hot Shot

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, March 1976

HOT SHOT is the first Junior Walker album in three years, which is surprising in light of the current reign of disco/dance music, Walker’s natural ...

10cc: How Dare You?

Review by Simon Frith, Rolling Stone, March 1976

The quintessential 10cc moment comes at the end of How Dare You?: an ethereal voice pleads, "Don't hang up!" The riff is pretty and relaxing. ...

Donna Summer: Love On The Road

Report and Interview by Richard Cromelin, Rolling Stone, March 1976

BEVERLY HILLS – The question was: how do you take a recording-studio orgasm on the road? "I'm sort of eager to find out myself," Donna ...

Grammys '76: Sham, Sham, Sham

Comment by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, March 1976

EACH YEAR, the American music industry embarrasses itself by nationally televising a 90-minute display of the irrelevant and the ridiculous, the Grammy Awards. ...

Funkadelic, Parliament: Parliament-Funkadelic: Mothership Connection

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, March 1976

WITH THE "Parliafunkadelicment thang", leader George Clinton has succeeded in creating two distinct identities for one band—the mystical voodoo of the Funkadelics and the stabbing, ...

Archie Bell and the Drells Still Dance All Night

Profile and Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, April 1976

NEW YORK – Archie Bell interrupts his rushed, businesslike replies for a moment and works up the faintest trace of a smile: "I didn't know ...

Hank Williams Jr.: Hank William Jr. and Friends

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, April 1976

LAST AUGUST, on a hunting trip near the Great Divide at Missoula, Montana, the recently divorced Hank Williams Jr. fell 500 feet down a mountainside, ...

Sutherland Brothers and Quiver: Reach for the Sky

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1976

THIS CLASSY ROCK GROUP from Britain somehow managed, over the course of its three Island albums, to grow progressively more obscure, despite an infectious '73 ...

Charlie Rich: Silver Linings

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, May 1976

GOSPEL MUSIC is certainly closer to Charlie Rich's natural milieu than anything he's done since he and Billy Sherrill hit on the ‘Behind Closed Doors’ ...

The Rolling Stones: Black and Blue (Rolling Stones)

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, May 1976

Decembers Children Today: Glimmer Twins Star As Stones Roll On ...

Dwight Twilley: Sincerely

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1976

IN AMERICA'S LESS CRISS-crossed midsection, young rockers have the opportunity to incubate their dreams – and their talents – free of pressure. The most romantic ...

The Emotions: Flowers

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, September 1976

SALVAGED FROM THE debris of the Stax bankruptcy, the Emotions have reemerged with one of the year's most refreshing soul albums. Producer Maurice White, who ...

Burning Spear: Man in the Hills (Island ILPS-9412)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, September 1976

THANKS TO this summer's marketing blitz, virtually the entire spectrum of reggae is now available in America, although not in any depth. ...

The Meters: The Meters: Paul's Mall, Boston

Live Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, November 1976

THE METERS may well be the finest performing American band. Without resorting to such modern pop trappings as smoke bombs and gyrating pianos, the Meters ...

The Bee Gees: Bee Gees: Children of the World

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, November 1976

FROM MUSHY pop ballads through late-Sixties psychedelia and low-key rock, the Bee Gees have demonstrated a chameleonlike ability to adapt to disparate pop trends. These ...

Bryan Ferry: Let's Stick Together

Review by Wayne Robins, Rolling Stone, November 1976

LET'S STICK TOGETHER is the least campy of Bryan Ferry's three solo albums. Rather than do suave interpretations of oldies as diverse as ‘It's My ...

Earth Wind and Fire: Spirit

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1976

The songs of Earth, Wind and Fire combine pure urban fantasy with the type of facile brotherhood messages that also crop up in the music ...

Earth Wind and Fire: Earth, Wind & Fire: Spirit

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1976

THE SONGS OF Earth, Wind and Fire combine pure urban fantasy with the type of facile brotherhood messages that also crop up in the music ...

Funkadelic: Tales of Kidd Funkadelic

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1976

WHAT YOU SEE ON Funkadelic album covers is what the band is about: "THE SABER-TOOTH, SLIPPERY TONGUED & MOST NASTIC MAU-MAU BOOTYBUSTERS OF NOXIOUS NEEGROW ...

O'Jays: Message in the Music

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1976

NOW THAT the Staples are unabashed sex merchants, the O'Jays are pop's foremost message mongerers. But the O'Jays don't write or produce their albums, so ...

The Critics' Critic

Essay by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, December 1976

THERE'S BEEN nothing but grief since Newsweek (or was it the Sunday New York Times!) decided that rock critics invented Bruce Springsteen. Only a moron ...

Graham Parker and the Rumour: Heat Treatment (Mercury)

Review by Simon Frith, Rolling Stone, December 1976

HEAT TREATMENT, Graham Parker’s second Mercury album, confirms the promise of his debut, Howlin’ Wind, which appeared earlier this year. The rapidity of the followup ...

Funkadelic, Parliament: Parliament/Funkadelic: Municipal Auditorium, New Orleans

Live Review by Wayne Robins, Rolling Stone, December 1976

A GOLD PYRAMID glitters onstage. Light beams, like giant mutant insect eyes, stare down at the audience. Musicians dressed for a Halloween party in some ...

Robin Trower: Why Robin Trower’s Not Appreciated At Home

Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, December 1976

LONDON– "IN America we’re important; when we hit a town it’s boy..." Robin Trower snaps his fingers and smiles, "it’s that kind of feeling. But ...

The Critics' Critic II

Essay by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, January 1977

ROCK CRITICISM is now often seen in many quarters as more important than rock itself. Many critics carry this one step further by superimposing their ...

Al Green: Have a Good Time

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, January 1977

IF HIS RECORDS ARE ANY indication, Al Green is a troubled, no, haunted man. ...

The Damned, The Sex Pistols: U.K. Report: Sex Pistols And Beyond

Report and Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, January 1977

LONDON – So this is how legends are born. Not with a song, or even a death, but with an expletive. ...

Gwen McCrae, KC & the Sunshine Band, Latimore: KC and the Sunshine Band: Part 3/Gwen McCrae: Something So Right/Latimore: It Ain't Where You Been

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, February 1977

IT WAS THE STUFF from which legends are carved: an office, a studio no larger than a motel room crammed with organs, pianos and a ...

Electric Light Orchestra, Steve Hillage: Electric Light Orchestra/Steve Hillage: Madison Square Garden, New York City

Live Review by John Swenson, Rolling Stone, February 1977

THIRTEEN YEARS after the Beatles played their first American concert at Carnegie Hall, the Electric Light Orchestra pads a headlining set at Madison Square Garden ...

Fleetwood Mac: Rumours

Review by John Swenson, Rolling Stone, April 1977

ROCK & ROLL HAS this bad habit of being unpredictable. You never can tell when a band will undergo that alchemic transmigration from lead to ...

Peter Gabriel: Peter Gabriel

Review by Stephen Demorest, Rolling Stone, May 1977

WHEN PETER GABRIEL resigned as frontman of Genesis two years ago, he said it was to search for the unexpected. On the evidence of his ...

Marvin Gaye: Live at the London Palladium

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, June 1977

ALONG WITH Van Morrison, Marvin Gaye must be considered one of the most reticent pop performers. This is his second live album in three years, ...

Nick Drake: Bryter Later

Review by Stephen Demorest, Rolling Stone, June 1977

NICK DRAKE may be the most ethereal recording artist I've ever heard. His fleeting career — the moody, mysterious music, the remote relationship with his ...

Asleep at the Wheel, Bob Wills & The Texas Playboys: The Texas Playboys, Asleep at the Wheel: Panther Hall, Fort Worth, Texas

Live Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, August 1977

"THIS ONE goes back to 1936," Leon McAuliffe grinned. "Bob told me, 'Leon, just hit a chord and then I'll say something,' and so I ...

Eric Carmen: Boats Against The Current

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, September 1977

THIS IS THE SORT of album people accuse Paul McCartney of making: syrupy romanticism without bite or backbeat. It is not as overtly classical as ...

The Animals: Before We Were So Rudely Interrupted (United Artists)

Review by Simon Frith, Rolling Stone, October 1977

LONG-DEAD GROUPS usually come back for commercial reasons – individual careers are slipping, the musicians are no longer recognized in the streets – and the ...

Richard Hell & The Void-Oids: Blank Generation (Sire SR 6037)

Review by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, October 1977

RICHARD HELL HAS been touted as an underground genius for nearly three years, and this debut album boldly tries to document him as such. The ...

Talking Heads: Talking Heads: 77

Review by Stephen Demorest, Rolling Stone, November 1977

TALKING HEADS are the last of CBGB's original Big Four to record (following Patti Smith, the Ramones and Television), and their debut is an absolute ...

The Persuasions: The Dying Art Of Friendly Persuasions

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, November 1977

NEW YORK – PERSUASIONS leader Jerry Lawson checked the refrigerator in his Bedford-Stuyvesant apartment one recent morning and found it nearly empty. ...

Diana Ross: Baby It's Me

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1977

DIANA ROSS' gifts aren't easy to capture on record. In fact, it's been a decade since anybody has done it consistently. She's campy and prone ...

Rod Stewart: Foot Loose and Fancy Free

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, December 1977

THERE'S SOMETHING to be said for the New Wave rebellion against (to borrow a phrase from the not-so-young-himself Willy De Ville) "old meat". Even if ...

Elvis Presley: Andy Kaufman Does De Elvis

Report by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, January 1978

OH, GOD, where did they find this poor soul, and what desperate circumstances could have resulted in his presence on stage before us? ...

Earth Wind and Fire: All 'n All

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, January 1978

AT THEIR WORST, Earth, Wind and Fire indulge in some of the most pretentious excesses in current black music. As on past Earth, Wind and ...

Bob Dylan, Joan Baez: Renaldo and Clara (dir: Bob Dylan; Circuit Films 232mins)

Film/DVD Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, March 1978

Ballad in plain dull ...

Warren Zevon on the Loose in Los Angeles

Profile and Interview by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, March 1978

IN THE OPENING LINES of the title song from Warren Zevon's new album, Excitable Boy, the title character smears Sunday pot roast all over his ...

George Thorogood & The Destroyers: George Thorogood and the Destroyers: George Thorogood and the Destroyers

Review by Greil Marcus, Rolling Stone, March 1978

WHEN I FIRST heard this record some months ago, I was appalled. "One bourbon, one Scotch and one beee-ah," George Thorogoood was mush-mouthing over the ...

Bonnie Raitt: Freebo's Travels With Bonnie

Interview by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, April 1978

LOS ANGELES – AT AN age when most rock musicians are superstars in decline, prosperous session players, or in their fifth or so year of ...

Foreigner’s Road Map: Destination Top Ten

Interview by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1978

IN THE SPRING of 1976, Mick Jones found himself. With a dwindling bank account and dim prospects, even after twelve years of playing guitar and ...

The Beatles: Beatlemania’s Boys in the Band

Report and Interview by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, May 1978

JOE PECORINO, A small, affable young man who earns his living by pretending to be John Lennon in the successful stage production, Beatlemania, denies that ...

Delbert McClinton: Second Wind (Capricorn)

Review by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, May 1978

DELBERT McClinton’s music reminds me of a frenzied 1972 R&B nonhit called 'Stoop Down Baby', on which singer Chick Willis runs down many verses of ...

The Manhattans: There’s No Good In Goodbye; It Feels So Good

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, May 1978

IN A FIELD ONCE glutted with heavyweights, lightweights and pretenders, the Manhattans stand almost alone, a throwback to an era when an orange sharkskin suit, ...

Etta James: Deep in the Night

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, June 1978

ONCE, WHEN I WAS FOURTEEN, I bought a copy of "My Dearest Darling" by Etta James, a record I'd heard as an oldie on a ...

Aretha Franklin: Almighty Fire

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, June 1978

THERE'S A SONG on Almighty Fire that has little to do with the rest of this Curtis Mayfield-produced album. 'I'm Your Speed' ends side two ...

Etta James

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, August 1978

IT IS A cruel irony that had she not been a junkie for thirteen of her forty years, Etta James would probably still be working ...

The Doors: An American Prayer

Review by Nick Tosches, Rolling Stone, January 1979

WHAT JIM MORRISON wanted more than anything – more than fame, more than wealth, more than the women's wet submission that fame brought with it ...

Carl Perkins' Family Affair

Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, February 1979

"WELL IT'S one for the money/Two for the show/I'd dance/But I'm too old," a beaming, bouncing forty-six-year-old Carl Perkins mocked from the Bottom Line stage ...

Richard and Linda Thompson, Richard Thompson: Richard and Linda Thompson's Flight From Convention

Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, April 1979

"IF I DON'T seem a part of the recording industry, it's probably because I don't feel a part of it," says Richard Thompson, the guitarist/songwriter/singer ...

George Harrison: An Interview with George Harrison

Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, April 1979

UP FOR THE DAY FROM HIS HOME IN OXFORDSHIRE, some 30 miles from London, George Harrison had spent the morning in the recording studio with ...

The Police Take to the Street

Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, May 1979

"STREET CREDIBILITY..." mutters Stewart Copeland, the American drummer in Britain’s Police, as he wearily runs a hand through his peroxide-blond hair. "Street credibility is full ...

Elvis Costello: What'd I Say?

Report by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, May 1979

Elvis Costello puts his foot in his mouth ...

Ultravox: The Low-Budget Way To See The U.S.A.

Report and Interview by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, June 1979

AS RECENTLY AS January, Britain’s Ultravox — purveyors of highly stylized, often outré music alternately reminiscent of Pink Floyd, Brian Eno and Roxy Music — ...

Punk Attack: 'The Obituary of Rock and Roll'

Book Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, June 1979

Julie Burchill and Tony Parsons: The Boy Looked at Johnny (Pluto Press) ...

Lene Lovich: The Bits and Myths of Lene Lovich

Profile and Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, August 1979

A VISION IN black, even her gingerbread pigtails decorated with a wedding cake of black lace, Lene Lovich sits in the unassuming offices of Stiff ...

Earth Wind and Fire: Earth Wind & Fire: I Am

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, August 1979

MAURICE WHITE, Earth, Wind and Fire's presiding genius, ranges across popular music like a robber baron, selecting only the tastiest artifacts for his collection. ...

Led Zeppelin: The Songs Remain The Same: Led Zeppelin at Knebworth Park

Live Review by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, October 1979

...

Ian Gomm: Pop’s Happy Amateur

Interview by Mick Brown, Rolling Stone, November 1979

"POP IS A MEANINGLESS term," Ian Gomm says as he takes a sip of beer in his manager’s London home. "But I’ve got a vested ...

Frank Zappa: The Myth Of Joe's Garage

Interview by John Swenson, Rolling Stone, December 1979

I'M STANDING ON the loading platform at L.A. International Airport at 2:30 in the morning, listening to a prerecorded voice that keeps repeating "...the white ...

Santana: Carlos Santana’s Journey Toward Perfection

Report and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, February 1980

"I’VE WANTED SOME Roy Rogers boots ever since I was a kid." Seated in his manager’s office, Devadip Carlos Santana pulls on a glistening red ...

Pete Townshend: Empty Glass

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, June 1980

AS A FUNDAMENTALLY religious artist, Pete Townshend fashions his music from sermons and confessions. Though it's not an easy thing for intellectuals to admit, this ...

Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels, Ted Nugent: Ted Nugent: Scream Dream/Mitch Ryder: Naked but Not Dead

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, August 1980

PAINTED IN CONTRASTING shades of urban blight, suburban boredom and rural decay, Michigan is perfect primitive rock & roll territory: a place where nothin' to ...

Peter Gabriel: Peter Gabriel

Review by Dave Marsh, Rolling Stone, September 1980

LUCID AND DRIVEN, Peter Gabriel's third solo album sticks in the mind like the haunted heroes of the best film noirs. With the obsessiveness of ...

Kurtis Blow Raps His Way To The Top

Report and Interview by John Morthland, Rolling Stone, March 1981

The sound of the streets hits the heartland ...

Journey: Escape **

Review by Deborah Frost, Rolling Stone, October 1981

'WHO'S CRYING Now', the hit single off Journey's hit LP, isn't super hip, super deep or even real, real hooky. But it does sound good. ...

Van Morrison

Profile and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, February 1982

VAN MORRISON's brown, two-story, shingled house sits alongside a narrow road that snakes up Mt. Tamalpais above the sleepy Marin County town of Mill Valley. ...

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers: Long After Dark

Review by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, January 1983

TOM PETTY and the Heartbreakers play a finely crafted band of meat-and-potatoes rock.  ...

George Clinton: the return of Dr. Funkenstein

Profile and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, June 1983

HEADS TURN when George Clinton enters a room. Any room. At the moment, the people in the lobby of the Beverly Hills Hotel are staring ...

Sunnyboys: Get Some Fun (Mushroom)

Review by Clinton Walker, Rolling Stone, 1984

THE SUNNYBOYS are a group who had success — or near-success, at least — thrust upon them at an early age, and although it's to ...

The Special AKA, The Specials: Special AKA: New Band, Old Cause

Profile and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, November 1984

SAN FRANCISCO: Jerry Dammers, leader of the Special AKA, is a very idealistic man. He believes, for instance, that popular songs can change the way ...

Deep Purple: Perfect Strangers

Review by Deborah Frost, Rolling Stone, February 1985

The title track comes blasting out of nowhere, like an I'm-alive-and-well message from an old friend you'd given up for dead. With its steamy vocal ...

John Fogerty: Fogerty Returns To The Stage

Live Review by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, March 1985

Oldies highlight show for cable TV ...

Bronski Beat: The Age of Consent (London/MCA)

Review by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, March 1985

NOW THAT FRANKIE HAS PROVEN TO BE a remote-controlled sham with less depth (not to mention stage presence) than its sloganeering T-shirts, the gay-rock mantle ...

Eric Clapton: Behind The Sun

Review by Deborah Frost, Rolling Stone, April 1985

Nobody ever said it was easy being God. Nobody ever said it was a gig Eric Clapton even asked for. The man has spent most ...

Los Lobos

Profile and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, April 1985

East L.A.'s favorite sons can play everything from blues to Tex-Mex ...

The Firm: The Firm

Review by Deborah Frost, Rolling Stone, April 1985

The Firm is the debut of the new band Jimmy Page has started with Paul Rodgers, the former leader of Free and Bad Company. The ...

Sade: Sophisticated Lady

Profile and Interview by Charles Shaar Murray, Rolling Stone, May 1985

Sade's elegant look and cool sound have made her pop music's most stylish female star ...

Black Flag, Flipper, Husker Du, Meat Puppets, The Minutemen, The Replacements: Punk Lives: The Minutemen, Meat Puppets and SST Records

Report and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, July 1985

They don't sound like the Ramones, and they don't look like the Sex Pistols, but bands like Hüsker Dü, the Minutemen and the Meat Puppets ...

The Seeds: Where Are They Now: Sky Saxon

Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, September 1985

The leader of the Seeds was 'Pushin' Too Hard' in the Sixties; now he'd into 'flower heaven power'. ...

The Red Hot Chili Peppers: Freaky Styley (EMI America/Enigma)

Review by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, October 1985

AFTER NEARLY two decades of racial division, popular music is in the midst of an overdue and exciting (if modest) effort to integrate itself. One ...

ZZ Top: Afterburner (Warner Bros.)

Review by Deborah Frost, Rolling Stone, December 1985

THE SOURCE of ZZ Top's appeal was never any secret to the beer drinkers and hell raisers who worshiped them the instant the band began ...

The Rolling Stone Interview: Bill Graham

Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, December 1985

The P.T. Barnum of rock & roll celebrates his twentieth anniversary ...

Diana Ross, Olivia Newton John: Olivia Newton-John: Soul Kiss/Diana Ross: Eaten Alive

Review by Davitt Sigerson, Rolling Stone, February 1986

HERE WE HAVE two of the biz' primo canaries coming up with long-awaited (and, you can bet, carefully considered) albums and not exactly setting the ...

10,000 Maniacs: The Wishing Chair (Elektra)

Review by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, March 1986

LEST 10,000 Maniacs be mistaken for members of the SoHo establishment, check your map: the sextet's home base, Jamestown, New York, is roughly the same ...

Prince Strips Down: Parade

Review by Davitt Sigerson, Rolling Stone, April 1986

WHO BUT PRINCE fills us today with the kind of anticipation we once reserved for new work by Bob Dylan, the Beatles and the Rolling ...

Madonna: True Blue

Review by Davitt Sigerson, Rolling Stone, July 1986

OF ALL CURRENT superstars, none has manipulated the apparatus of fame more astutely than Madonna. Like Prince, she recognized the virtue of a one-word name ...

Lionel Richie: Dancing on the Ceiling

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, November 1986

Lionel Richie will never surprise you. His triumph has been his ability to turn conservative dependability into a commercial, and at times even an aesthetic, ...

The Band, Robbie Robertson: Robbie Robertson

Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, April 1987

Fireworks were going off in the Sixties. Music was happening quicker than people could deal with. ...

Boy George, Culture Club: Boy George: Mr. Clean

Report and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, October 1987

Boy George Straightens Up His Act ...

Michael Jackson: Bad

Review by Davitt Sigerson, Rolling Stone, October 1987

MICHAEL JACKSON is a man. Agreed, he is a young man, emotional age about thirteen, with a young man's interest in cars, girls, scary movies ...

Sting: Nothing Like The Sun

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, December 1987

Nothing Like The Sun – a powerful, often hypnotic album that blends jazz and rock styles into a thoughtful suite of twelve songs about love, ...

Public Image Ltd: Public Image Limited: Happy? (Virgin)

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, February 1988

TEN YEARS ago he was burying Led Zepplin; now he's praising it. Such are the artistic swings from Johnny Rotten (ne Lydon), professional iconoclast. Not ...

Negativland: Escape From Noise (Seeland)

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, May 1988

DOORS SLAM/PEOPLE yell/Children scream/Sirens whine/Trucks rumble and roar/And rock music blares, as Negativland asks the musical question "Is there any escape from noise?" ...

Public Enemy: Rockin' The Joint

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, September 1988

The incendiary rappers preach black self-sufficiency at New York's Riker's Island. But are they prisoners of their own racist doctrine? By Michael Azerrad ...

David Lindley: The Weird World Of David Lindley

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, October 1988

DAVID LINDLEY has found the oud of his dreams in a guitar store on Manhattan's Forty-eighth Street. "This is a beauty," he says, admiring the ...

Dwight Yoakam: Buenos Noches From A Lonely Room

Review by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, October 1988

SINCE FOCUSING the public eye on his archival brand of country music with Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. two years ago, Dwight Yoakam has been good ...

Run DMC: Concert Violence: Who's to Blame?

Report by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, November 1988

Action needed in the wake of recent deaths at rap and metal shows ...

Michelle Shocked: Short, Sharp, Talented

Profile and Interview by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, November 1988

Is country-folk singer Michelle Shocked ready for stardom? ...

James Brown Addicted To PCP

Report by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, November 1988

Friends of the soul singer say drug has 'whipped him' ...

Crosby Stills Nash & Young: Crosby Stills Nash and Young: American Dream

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, January 1989

American Dream fades out on the line "Why not keep on singing anyway?" – and that lackadaisical slogan seems to sum up the spirit in ...

Steve Earle: A Bad Boy Settles Down

Report and Interview by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, January 1989

STEVE EARLE recently released his third album, Copperhead Road, and married his fifth wife, Teresa. Considering that last New Year's Day found him in a ...

Lyle Lovett: Lyle Lovett and His Large Band (MCA/Curb) ****

Review by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, February 1989

LYLE LOVETT has always been a little bit schizophrenic. A Nashville musician with big-band leanings, Lovett has somehow managed to gracefully walk the line between ...

The Replacements: Don't Tell a Soul (Sire/Reprise) ***½

Review by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, February 1989

The Replacements' Adult Entertainment ...

Lou Reed: New York

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, February 1989

NEW YORK is Lou Reed's rock & roll version of The Bonfire of the Vanities. But whereas Tom Wolfe maintains an ultimately cynical distance from ...

Cowboy Junkies Shoot For Success

Interview by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, March 1989

NASHVILLE'S BLUEBIRD CAFE is packed for the local debut of the Cowboy Junkies. The Canadian bands lethargic cover of 'Sweet Jane' has been talked up ...

De La Soul: 3 Feet High and Rising (Tommy Boy)

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, March 1989

DE LA SOUL HAS already mastered the three Js of postmodernism: juxtapose, juxtapose, juxtapose. Welcome to the first psychedelic hip-hop record. ...

De La Soul's Hippie-hop: Psychedelic Rappers Introduce the DA.I.S.Y. Age

Profile and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, May 1989

"HELLO, YOU'VE reached Mars. What can I do for you?" Trugoy the Dove is on the telephone in the tidy basement of his parents' house ...

Randy Newman: Coach House, San Juan Capistrano, CA

Live Review by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, May 1989

Old Four Eyes Is Back ...

Radio's Rock of Ages

Report by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, June 1989

Is the classic-rock format dictating which acts record companies sign? ...

The Bangles: Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Los Angeles CA

Live Review by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, June 1989

Heroines Take a Fall ...

Tim Finn: All's Well That Enz Well

Profile and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, June 1989

ONE OF TIM Finn's best re-cent gigs was performing at a sheepshearing party in his native New Zealand. Along with his brother, Neil Finn of ...

Wendy and Lisa: Fruit at the Bottom (Columbia) ** 1/2

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, June 1989

ON THEIR 1987 debut album, Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman seemed to be bending over backward not to sound like Prince, whose band they had ...

k.d. lang: k.d.lang: Absolute Torch and Twang

Review by Holly Gleason, Rolling Stone, July 1989

Absolute Torch and Twang – the third major-label LP by Canadian chanteuse K.D. Lang and the second with her band the Reclines – splits the ...

The Cult: Cult Following

Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, July 1989

Once postpunk's bad boys, the members of the Cult have found fame with Sonic Temple ...

Bread

Retrospective by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, August 1989

BREAD VIRTUALLY invented soft rock in the early Seventies, and the group's biggest hits – 'Make It With You', 'If', 'Baby I'm-a Want You' and ...

Grand Funk Railroad: Mark Farner

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, August 1989

"THE TRUE JOY that I have now comes from knowing Jesus Christ as my Savior and my Lord, and rendering my life in servitude to ...

The Cure: Searching For The Cure

Report and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, September 1989

Can the masters of "mope rock" enjoy life at the top? ...

The Cure, Love and Rockets, The Pixies, Shelleyann Orphan: Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey

Live Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, October 1989

HAD SOMEONE predicted in 1978 that 49,223 people in a stadium would one day clap and sing along as the Gothic rockers in the Cure ...

Tears For Fears: Tears for Fears: Fear of Finishing

Report and Interview by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, November 1989

Songs From The Big Delay: How Tears For Fears Took Four Years To Sprout The Seeds of Love ...

Rickie Lee Jones: Flying Cowboys

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, November 1989

Flying Cowboys simultaneously bears the distinctive mark of Rickie Lee Jones's wild, unruly talent and continues the steady process by which her art is achieving ...

Tears For Fears: Tears for Fears: The Seeds Of Love (PolyGram) ****

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, November 1989

AFTER THE release of Tears For Fears' mammoth-selling second album, Songs From the Big Chair, in 1985, an English music paper remarked, "It'll soon be ...

B.B. King: Mississippi Homecoming

Report and Interview by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, November 1989

RILEY B. KING, a son of the Mississippi Delta and by everyone's admission but his own the King of the Blues, stands by a two-lane ...

Jeff Beck, Stevie Ray Vaughan: Jeff Beck & Stevie Ray Vaughan: Guitar Slingers Shoot It Out

Report and Interview by Ted Drozdowski, Rolling Stone, November 1989

Jeff Beck and Stevie Ray Vaughan go head-to-head on U.S. tour ...

Echo & The Bunnymen, Ian McCulloch: Ian McCulloch

Interview by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, February 1990

AN HOUR BEFORE Echo and the Bunnymen went onstage in Osaka, Japan for the final date of a world tour in April 1988, singer Ian ...

The Jungle Brothers: Jungle Brothers: Done by the Forces of Nature (Warner Bros.) ***1/2

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, February 1990

THE JUNGLE Brothers are part of the Native Tongues, a triumvirate of innovative rap groups (including De la Soul and A Tribe Called Quest) united ...

Roxanne Shanté: Bad Sister ****

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, February 1990

RECORDED BETWEEN laundry loads in 1985 when she was fourteen years old, Roxanne Shanté's first single, 'Roxanne's Revenge', was a spontaneous storm of sassy rap ...

The B-52s: Mission Accomplished

Report and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, March 1990

...

A Tribe Called Quest: People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm ***

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, April 1990

INASMUCH AS THE arch and arty New York hip-hop foursome A Tribe Called Quest exudes any enthusiasm at all on its debut album, that enthusiasm ...

Depeche Mode: Violator **

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, June 1990

AS EDISON MIGHT have put it, most great disco is one-percent inspiration, ninety-nine-percent perspiration. Its unguarded vulgarity is what puts it over – "I'm not ...

Big Brother & The Holding Company, Charlatans, The (US), Country Joe McDonald, Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, Quicksilver Messenger Service: The San Francisco Sound

Retrospective and Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, August 1990

"My eyes were opened. There's a new world and a new society and a new spirit." ...

The Neville Brothers: Neville Brothers: Brother's Keeper

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, September 1990

SHOUDN’T IT BE A CLINCH TO PRODUCE a consistently breathtaking Neville Brothers album? Wouldn’t one have only to hand Aaron Neville a collection of worthy ...

Alice In Chains, Mother Love Bone, The Posies: A Seattle Slew

Report and Interview by Dave DiMartino, Rolling Stone, September 1990

Record companies are flocking to the Great Northwest, signing bands like crazy and hoping to find the Next Big Thing ...

Stevie Ray Vaughan 1954-1990

Obituary by John Swenson, Rolling Stone, October 1990

STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN has died, and with him goes the spirit of Jimi Hendrix once again. Vaughan was linked to Hendrix throughout his playing life. ...

Warrant: Cherry Pie

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, October 1990

IN VIEW OF MÖTLEY CRÜE’S AND OZZY Osbourne’s ongoing mega-stardom, it’s hard to imagine that success in heavy metal is the result of anything other ...

The Pixies: Surfing With The Aliens: The Pixies

Report and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, November 1990

THE KIDS AT England's annual Reading festival are a scruffy lot. A ‘90s hybrid of hippie and punk, they wear tie-dyed T-shirts, asymmetrical hairdos, jeans ...

AC/DC: The Razors Edge

Review by John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, November 1990

SINCE THE HEYDAY of Little Richard, one of the things that teenagers have liked most about rock & roll is that it can provoke parents ...

The Waterboys: Beacon Theater, New York NY

Live Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, January 1991

ON THE Waterboys' 1988 tour, the stage was thick with musicians playing Irish folk instruments while leader Mike Scott hung back on acoustic guitar. But ...

Jimmie Vaughan, Stevie Ray Vaughan: Jimmie Vaughan: Picking Up the Pieces

Interview by John Swenson, Rolling Stone, February 1991

After the death of his brother, Jimmie Vaughan carried on ...

Chris Isaak

Interview by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, April 1991

Hot Ticket Chris Isaak: The last time he played Los Angeles, he couldn't get a sound check. ...

Malcolm McLaren, Pop Will Eat Itself: Pop Will Eat Itself: Cure for Sanity; Malcolm McLaren: Round the Outside! Round the Outside!

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, April 1991

EVER SINCE the Who and the Stones, if not the Revolutionary War, uppity British ironists have made a habit of "elevating" vulgar American pop crazes ...

David Ruffin, The Temptations: Former Temptation David Ruffin Dies

Obituary by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, July 1991

DAVID RUFFIN, a former lead singer for the Temptations, died of a drug overdose in the early-morning hours of June 1st at the Hospital of ...

Fabulous Thunderbirds: The Fabulous Thunderbirds: Walk That Walk, Talk That Talk (Epic)

Review by John Swenson, Rolling Stone, October 1991

IT'S HARD TO imagine the fabulous Thunderbirds without founding member Jimmie Vaughan. ...

Nirvana: Nevermind (DGC)

Review by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, November 1991

DESPITE THE hand-wringing the fanzines do each time an indie-rock hero signs a major-label deal, righteous postpunk stars from Hüsker Dü to Soundgarden have joined ...

Grateful Dead, John Fogerty, Neil Young: Bill Graham: Tribute Concert, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

Live Review by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, December 1991

ON SUNDAY, November 3rd, more than 300,000 people showed up at the Polo Field in Golden Gate Park for the biggest rock concert ever held ...

Michael Jackson: The Making Of The King Of Pop

Report by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, January 1992

THE SEVEN DWARFS are singing. Their voices are floating out of speakers hidden among the trees and lush flora surrounding Michael Jackson's mansion in Neverland ...

My Bloody Valentine: The Sound of the Future: My Bloody Valentine

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, February 1992

"WE'D LIKE TO COME OUT FROM the shadow of the greatest things ever done," declares Kevin Shields, the soft-spoken, bookish-looking leader of My Bloody Valentine. ...

Bryan Adams: The Ritz, New York City

Live Review by Ira Robbins, Rolling Stone, March 1992

THE BIRTH OF ROCK & ROLL WAS A messy business. With an instinctive need for communication that just couldn’t wait for formal language, the baby ...

XTC: Nonsuch (Geffen)

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, March 1992

A CHARTER MEMBER of England's class of '77, XTC is one of the few bands from that era to remain virtually intact. ...

Nirvana: Inside the Heart and Mind of Kurt Cobain

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, April 1992

FOR NOW, Kurt Cobain and his new wife Courtney Love, live in an apartment in Los Angeles's modest Fairfax district. The living room holds little ...

Green River, The Melvins, Mudhoney, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Supersuckers: Seattle: Grunge City

Report and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, April 1992

For real rockers Seattle is the ultimate wet dream. By Michael Azerrad ...

Juliana Hatfield, The Lemonheads: The Lemonheads, Juliana Hatfield: The Paradise, Boston, Massachusetts

Live Review by Ted Drozdowski, Rolling Stone, August 1992

EVAN DANDOand Juliana Hatfield make the kind of garage pop that's kept Boston's collegiate audiences enthralled since 1980, when the local favorites the Neighborhoods recorded ...

Grateful Dead, Jerry Garcia: Jerry Garcia Ill; Dead Cancel Tour

Report by Michael Goldberg, Rolling Stone, October 1992

THE GRATEFUL Dead have canceled a four-city fall tour of the East Coast and have put other plans on hold until Jerry Garcia recovers from ...

Nirvana: Reading Festival, England

Live Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, October 1992

"FUCK WOODSTOCK," read one popular T-shirt here, although this twentieth annual jamboree also began with lots of wasted folks frolicking in the mud and ended ...

Nirvana: New Noise for '93

Report and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, January 1993

After a successful European summer tour and a sold-out show at the mammoth 45,000-seat Velez Sarsfield Stadium, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, what has the world's ...

The Beastie Boys, Henry Rollins: The Beastie Boys, Rollins Band: Roseland Ballroom New York NY

Live Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, January 1993

THIS PAIRING wasn't as odd as it seemed, because the Beastie Boys have created ― or at least mobilized ― a new kind of fan. ...

Bikini Kill: Bikini Kill EP (Kill Rock Stars)

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, February 1993

ANY DECENT PARENT would be proud of a daughter who staked her claim as a "riot grrrl" these days. ...

Curtis Mayfield: The Anthology 1961-1977

Review by Joe McEwen, Rolling Stone, February 1993

CURTIS MAYFIELD and the Impressions: The Anthology, a two-CD, forty-song set, is a remarkable document. Lovingly assembled by Chicago-soul authority Robert Pruter, this collection connects ...

Dinosaur Jr: Where You Been (Sire) ****

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, February 1993

TODAY'S TWENTYSOMETHINGS didn't grow up on the Beatles and the Stones. They grew up on Kiss, Peter Frampton and Neil Young. Making something meaningful out ...

Screaming Trees: The Lost Boys

Profile and Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, February 1993

IT IS THE second of a pair of Seattle homecoming shows that close their tour with Alice in Chains, and Screaming Trees are well into ...

Whitney Houston: Down and Dirty

Interview by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, June 1993

YOU'RE EXPECTING her to float delicately into the room, but Whitney Houston strides in with a purposeful air. She's dressed way down in purple stretch ...

Bruce Springsteen: Bruce Rocks the U.K - But He Can't Match His Own Impossibly High Standards

Live Review by David Sinclair, Rolling Stone, June 1993

"WHEN I WAS YOUNG, I truly didn't think music had any limitations," said Bruce Springsteen in an interview with New York Newsday last year. "I ...

Butthole Surfers: The Butthole Surfers: In Through the Back Door

Profile and Interview by Jason Cohen, Rolling Stone, June 1993

The Butthole Surfers are the certified shock jocks of the next wave ...

PJ Harvey: Primed and Ticking

Interview by Deborah Frost, Rolling Stone, August 1993

PJ Harvey beat the sophomore jinx and get their mojo workin' with an American tour and their powerful new album, Rid of Me ...

John Peel: Q&A: John Peel

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, August 1993

"HELLO, I'M A little fat chap that plays records on the radio," DJ John Peel announced at the start of a recent broadcast. ...

Björk: Debut (Elektra)

Review by Tom Graves, Rolling Stone, September 1993

MONTHS BEFORE the Sugar Cubes' first album debuted in the United States, a heavy buzz began to circulate about the group's lead singer, Björk. ...

The Fall: Mark E. Smith's Wrath & Roll

Profile and Interview by Jason Cohen, Rolling Stone, September 1993

MARK E. SMITH is one of Britain's great misanthropes. On the 1980 live album Totale's Turns, only the third record by his band the Fall, ...

Bikini Kill, Huggy Bear: Huggy Bear: Our Troubled Youth/Bikini Kill: Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah (Kill Rock Stars) ****

Review by Evelyn McDonnell, Rolling Stone, September 1993

PICTURE a punk rocker: Ian MacKaye and Emma Goldman are her heroes. She reads Maximum Rock 'n Roll and plays 'Holidays In The Sun' on ...

Debbie Harry: Deborah Harry: Debravation (Sire/Reprise)

Review by Evelyn McDonnell, Rolling Stone, October 1993

BACK WHEN Blondie was becoming America's biggest New Wave band, Deborah Harry's deadpan lyric barbs cut the edges around her paper-doll appearance. This is the ...

Smashing Pumpkins' Sudden Impact

Interview by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, October 1993

BILLY CORGAN is laughing and slapping his knee.  ...

PJ Harvey: P.J. Harvey: 4-Track Demos

Review by Evelyn McDonnell, Rolling Stone, November 1993

THE POP INDUSTRY loves to simulate authenticity, a trick that, like the manufacturing of fake antiques, puts demands on the consumer. It's hard to tell ...

Uncle Tupelo: Anodyne

Review by Mark Kemp, Rolling Stone, December 1993

BEFORE UNCLE TUPELO'S No Depression sneaked out of Belleville, Ill., in 1990, the respective sounds of Sonic Youth and Lynyrd Skynyrd probably never occupied a ...

CBGB: This Ain't No Mudd Club

Report by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, February 1994

CBGB celebrates its 20 years of rock & roll ...

Kate Bush: Dear Diary: The Secret World of Kate Bush

Interview by David Sinclair, Rolling Stone, February 1994

CRICKLEWOOD IS not at all the kind of place you would expect to find Kate Bush. Although immortalized long ago in the title of a ...

Beck: Mellow Gold

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, May 1994

WHETHER BY preference or rationalization, slacker victims trumpet their dropout status with dilapidated jeans, greasy hair and a sarcastic, defeatist posture. Enter 23-year-old Beck singing, ...

Nirvana: Kurt Cobain: Live Through This

Obituary by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, June 1994

LAST SPRING, Kurt Cobain sat at his kitchen table at 3 a.m., chain-smoking and toying with one of the medical mannequins he collected. "It's hard ...

Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett: Pink Floyd: The Division Bell; Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond

Review by Tom Graves, Rolling Stone, June 1994

IS THIS still really Pink Floyd? That seems to be the question, as it has been since Roger Waters left the band in 1985 to ...

Laurie Anderson: The Nerve Of Her

Interview by Gillian G. Gaar, Rolling Stone, June 1994

THE GENERAL PUBLIC MAY HAVE heard little from performance artist Laurie Anderson in recent years. But that's certain to change in 1994, a hectic year ...

Paul McCartney: Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest and Come Together: Motown Sings The Beatles

Review by Gillian G. Gaar, Rolling Stone, June 1994

THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER, Paul McCartney has occasionally ventured into atypical musical genres anonymously or under an assumed name. In 1974, under the guise of the ...

Coolio: The Big Payback

Profile and Interview by Carol Cooper, Rolling Stone, September 1994

COOLIO gets a phat return on his dues with 'FANTASTIC VOYAGE' ...

Clarence Clemons

Profile and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1995

YOU'D THINK he’d be pissed off, but the title of his new album — Peacemaker — should have given me a clue. The man still ...

Counting Crows — Adam Duritz interviewed

Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1995

BACKSTAGE AT the Shepherd's Bush Empire, Adam Duritz is opening a gift from a fan. Coasters. Normal ones, the sort you'd buy your dad for ...

Gary Moore, Peter Green: Gary Moore on Peter Green

Report and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1995

"TONIGHT IS a bit different", says Gary Moore from the stage to a packed London theatre. "We’re celebrating the music of a very special man." ...

Grateful Dead: Land of the Dead

Report by Ben Fong-Torres, Rolling Stone, 1995

WHEN IN THE MID-SIXTIES San Francisco came to represent nothing left to lose, there was a handful of identifiable pioneers who changed the face, the ...

King Crimson

Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1995

"KING CRIMSON," says Adrian Belew, "does a brand of music that no-one else does, a sound that no-one else makes." Robert Fripp calls it "the ...

Radiohead

Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1995

"THE LAST couple of years", says Thom Yorke, "have been pretty mind-altering." Thom, 26, is so thin and sharp-edged you’d cut yourself if you touched ...

Pearl Jam: Radio Free Vedder

Report by Gillian G. Gaar, Rolling Stone, February 1995

"HEY... AM I on?" were the uncertain first words delivered by Pearl Jam singer-cum-DJ Eddie Vedder at the start of the band's latest frolic on ...

Cake Like: Delicious (Avant/Sphere)

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, March 1995

THE MEMBERS OF Cake Like reportedly formed a band because they were sick of listening to their musician boyfriends talk about their bands. They may just get ...

Simple Minds: Moore Theater, Seattle

Live Review by Gillian G. Gaar, Rolling Stone, March 1995

IT COULD be coincidence that Simple Minds kicked off their first tour in three years in Seattle. Given the band's unveiling of a rougher-edged, guitar-based ...

Thurston Moore: Psychic Hearts

Review by Mark Kemp, Rolling Stone, June 1995

THURSTON MOORE has said that although he's flattered when younger bands cite Sonic Youth as an influence, it would be nice if the group were ...

Hole Is A Band

Report and Interview by Jason Cohen, Rolling Stone, August 1995

While the Courtney saga continues, Hole prove that a rock & roll band is the sum of its parts ...

TLC: Pretty Young Things

Interview by Carol Cooper, Rolling Stone, August 1995

The women of TLC stay cool under fire ...

Lenny Kravitz: Circus

Review by Mark Kemp, Rolling Stone, September 1995

IN THE TITLE TRACK of Lenny Kravitz's new album, the singer struggles with the dictates of reality that come to bear on fantasy. "Welcome to ...

Bryan Ferry, Roxy Music: Bryan Ferry

Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, October 1995

You’ve just celebrated your 50th birthday. Traumatic? ...

Garbage: Clean Sweep

Report and Interview by Jason Cohen, Rolling Stone, October 1995

Garbage's masterminds craft murky pop into an album that's impossible to refuse ...

Supergrass: The Mod Squad

Profile and Interview by David Sinclair, Rolling Stone, October 1995

IT'S A GLORIOUS SUMMER DAY in Oxford, city of dreaming spires in the heart of England. Three young tykes laugh and joke with each other ...

Afghan Whigs get Soulful on Their New LP, Black Love

Report and Interview by Dave Thompson, Rolling Stone, November 1995

JOE PIXIE IS PISSED. TWO FEET TALL, with a voice like a pubescent munchkin, he has been phoning around local fast-food joints trying to get ...

Prince: The Gold Experience

Review by Carol Cooper, Rolling Stone, November 1995

With this LP, our former Prince turns in his most effortlessly eclectic set since 1987’s Sign O’ The Times. ...

Dwight Yoakam: Gone

Review by Geoffrey Himes, Rolling Stone, December 1995

EVEN TODAY the stereotype lingers that country songs are all words – storytelling lyrics backed by merely functional music. That cliché can be shattered once ...

Bush

Report and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1996

"HELLO", says Gavin Rossdale, slumped against the sofa on the trailer floor after a day of interviews. "We’re Bush — calculating, conniving, formulaic opportunists. Who ...

Dire Straits No More

Report and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1996

DIRE STRAITS is dead. Or as good as. The grave may open once in a while for the odd charity appearance, but as to another ...

Kula Shaker and the New Psychedelia

Report by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1996

BRITPOP’s ‘60s revivalism has brought in its wake all manner of cosmic hoo-hah. Hallucinogens have taken over from cigarettes-and-alcohol as the switched-on Englishman’s millenium-blues-buster of ...

Little Axe: Sugar Hill to Stoke Newington

Report and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1996

THE MAN the critics are calling the missing link between Jimi Hendrix and King Tubby is sitting in a grim pub in an untrendy part ...

The Cure

Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1996

THEY'RE LIVING in a house, a very big house, in the country. "Actually", says Robert Smith, showing me around the candlelit ground floor, smoky log ...

The Tony Rich Project: Words

Review by Carol Cooper, Rolling Stone, 1996

If ’94 and ’95 were the years that quirky auteurs like Dionne Farris and Des’ree caught the public’s imagination, 1996 may be the year that ...

Grateful Dead: Dead End: The Grateful Dead Call It Quits

Report and Interview by David Gans, Rolling Stone, January 1996

Surviving members focus on solo projects ...

Junior Walker & The Allstars: Junior Walker 1931-1995

Obituary by Geoffrey Himes, Rolling Stone, January 1996

IN EARLY 1965, a new single lit up American radio. It began with a gunshot, echoed by the snare drum that followed. Then a tenor ...

Stereolab: Simple Minds

Interview by Simon Reynolds, Rolling Stone, April 1996

"Repetition in the music and we're never gonna lose it," sang Mark E. Smith of the English post-punk legends the Fall in the aptly titled ...

Girls Against Boys: House Of GVSB

Review by Michael Azerrad, Rolling Stone, May 1996

FOR ALL their rebel posturing, many so-called alternative bands still adhere to the old-fashioned conventions of melody and verse-chorus-verse. But not Girls Against Boys. ...

Mickey Hart, Robert Hunter: Hart and Hunter: Opening the Mystery Box

Interview by Richard Gehr, Rolling Stone, May 1996

So what's so mysterious about the Mystery Box?Mickey Hart: The musical mystery is, How do you marry tuned percussion and voice? And on a metaphorical ...

Chic: Bernard Edwards, 1952-1996

Obituary by Geoffrey Himes, Rolling Stone, June 1996

BACK IN THE DISCO era, when most records went thump-thump-thump, the music produced by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers went bumpity-bip-bop, bing-bang-boom. ...

Phish: Billy Breathes (Elektra)

Review by Richard Gehr, Rolling Stone, September 1996

Phish's sixth album, A Live One (released last year) distilled a decade's worth of dedicated roadwork by a group that reinvented improvised rock for a ...

The Prodigy: Prodigy: End Fest, Bremberton, Washington

Live Review by Gillian G. Gaar, Rolling Stone, September 1996

ON THE one hand, it was hard to see why Prodigy were chosen to close End Fest; the annual daylong outdoor music festival is usually ...

Stone Temple Pilots: Universal Amphitheater, California

Live Review by Dave DiMartino, Rolling Stone, December 1996

SCOTT WEILAND seemed the picture of health at the opening night of Stone Temple Pilots' current six-week tour, confounding the expectations of some cynics who ...

The Sex Pistols: Return of The Sex Pistols

Report and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, Summer 1996

The jury’s out. It’s either the ultimate joke, the perfect punch-line — plump, forty, pimple-free Johnny Rotten with a tan only sensible living and serious ...

The Sex Pistols: Finsbury Park, London

Live Review by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, Summer 1996

"WELL?" Johnny Rotten asked the 30,000-strong crowd dotting the park — not a sell-out, despite weeks of hype and a festival-sized bill, though more than ...

Mark Eitzel, R.E.M.: Mark Eitzel with Peter Buck: Union Chapel, London

Live Review by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1997

AN OLD CHAPEL in Islington, North London, Prime Minister Tony Blair’s old ‘hood. The stage is set up around the pulpit; the audience sits in ...

The Cure: An interview with Robert Smith

Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1997

THE ROAD to Christmas is choked with compilation albums. Greatest Hits and Best Ofs, collections of the safe-and-familiar-plus-bonus-new-track clog up the record shops at this ...

Offspring: Ixnay On The Hombre

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, January 1997

IN PURE IQ-test terms – singer Dexter Holland is just inches away from his microbiology Ph.D., for Christ's sake – the Offspring might rank as ...

Erykah Badu: Baduizm (Kedar Entertainment/Universal)

Review by Miles Marshall Lewis, Rolling Stone, February 1997

PERHAPS THE first thing you notice about Erykah Badu is her uncanny vocal similarity to Billie Holiday – from the very beginning of Baduizm, Badu's ...

Sloan: One Chord to Another

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, March 1997

SOMETIMES YOU JUST feel like telling the '60s to go away. As if all those gleefully plagiarizing Brit-pop bands weren't enough, now we have a ...

U2: Pop

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, March 1997

IT IS HARD to believe we’re a whole decade away from The Joshua Tree – U2’s very own Born In The USA, its Purple Rain, ...

Courtney Love: Love's Labor Lost

Interview by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, April 1997

How Courtney blew her fight for an Oscar nomination as the junkie wife of a porn king in The People vs. Larry Flynt ...

Beck: The Rolling Stone Interview

Interview by Mark Kemp, Rolling Stone, April 1997

"YOU gotta do the chicken thing again." Beck's manager interrupts the 26-year-old singer's lunch on the set of the British popular music show TFI Friday ...

The Notorious B.I.G.: Murder Ballads: The Notorious B.I.G.: Life After Death (Bad Boy)

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, May 1997

IN A FRIGHTENING WAY, the current hip-hop scene recalls the end of Goodfellas: The major players are turning up dead, heading off to prison or ...

Hanson: Middle Of Nowhere (Mercury) ***

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, June 1997

'MMMBOP', the debut hit by kiddie trio Hanson that's now warming up Top 40 charts and fourth-grade hearts, sticks in your brain like Trident in ...

John Fogerty: Swamp Thing

Interview by Dave DiMartino, Rolling Stone, June 1997

AFTER 10 LONG YEARS, John Fogerty is back with Blue Moon Swamp, his first album since 1986's Eye of the Zombie, and it is a far better, breezier affair. ...

The Dandy Warhols: Dandy Warhols, The: …The Dandy Warhols Come Down (Capitol)

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, July 1997

IT'S A SILLY NAME, of course, one guaranteed to discourage people from taking them seriously. And maybe seriousness isn't the issue anyway. ...

The Prodigy: Prodigy: The Fat Of The Land

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, August 1997

RARELY HAS a pop trend been so shamelessly spoon-fed to America as the hold-all genre dubbed "electronica". Rarely, indeed, has the music industry tried so ...

Fela Kuti: Fela Anikulapo-Kuti 1938-1997

Obituary by Vivien Goldman, Rolling Stone, September 1997

KING OF AFRO BEAT DEAD AT 58 ...

Stereolab: Dots and Loops

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, October 1997

PITY THE cerebral technicians of Stereolab, whose coolly subversive fusion of muzak and krautrock has for too long condemned them to the Critics’ Darling ghetto. ...

The Rolling Stones: Bridges To Babylon (Virgin) ****

Review by Mark Kemp, Rolling Stone, October 1997

ON THEIR last two albums, the Rolling Stones proved that they still had verve and stamina, and that they could re-create the sounds of their ...

The Beatles: Derek Taylor 1932-1997

Obituary by Philip Norman, Rolling Stone, October 1997

THE SIMPLE term "music publicist" does not begin to describe Derek Taylor, who died from cancer of the esophagus at his home, in Suffolk, England, ...

Fleetwood Mac: Back In The Chain Gang

Retrospective and Interview by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, October 1997

Fleetwood Mac were the lovingest, fightingest, druggingest band of the '70s. Twenty years later, the psychodrama continues… ...

Mariah Carey: Butterfly

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, October 1997

ON WHAT IS something of a transitional album, the recently separated Mariah Carey moves still further away from the warmed-over Whitney Houston of Carey's early ...

Fiona Apple

Interview by Evelyn McDonnell, Rolling Stone, November 1997

FIONA APPLE is 20 years and one
 album old, and already she knows the
 bipolar swings of stardom. Thanks to
 one fortuitously placed demo tape, ...

Sinead O'Connor

Interview by Vivien Goldman, Rolling Stone, November 1997

AT AGE 30, Sinead O'Connor seems to be experiencing a rebirth with her critically acclaimed new EP, Gospel Oak, and the ecstatic reception to her ...

Shania Twain: Come On Over***

Review by Chuck Eddy, Rolling Stone, December 1997

THE FIRST thing you notice about Shania Twain's Come On Over, once you get past her pretty pictures on the cover, is how the titles ...

Phish: Slip, Stitch and Pass

Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, December 1997

LIKE The Grateful Dead, the eternally jamming Phish are best judged by their concerts. ...

Jimmy Page/Robert Plant, Led Zeppelin: Page & Plant

Report and Interview by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, 1998

THE VERY IDEA of MTV as deus ex machina is enough to send shudders down the hardiest spine. But MTV it was who approached Robert ...

Black Sabbath: NEC, Birmingham

Live Review by Sylvie Simmons, Rolling Stone, February 1998

BLACK SABBATH. Industrial hell turned up to 11, baptised in blood and leather, and leather is cows and cows are sacred, and Heavy Metal doesn't ...

Pavement: Wowee Zowee

Review by Mark Kemp, Rolling Stone, February 1998

WHAT DOES A defiantly anti-corporate rock band do when it starts getting too much attention? In Pavement's case, they recoil. ...

Bobby Bland: Love Throat: Bobby "Blue" Bland

Interview by Robert Gordon, Rolling Stone, May 1998

BOBBY BLAND'S people seat me at a table, make sure I'm comfortable. An effective entrance demands the proper set-up. ...

Massive Attack: Mezzanine (Virgin)

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, May 1998

ELDER STATESMEN of the moody dance genre that used to be called trip-hop, Massive Attack like to take their time making albums. So long, indeed, ...

Ronnie Spector: Rolling Ronette

Report by Jaan Uhelszki, Rolling Stone, December 1998

YOU CAN BET it wasn't the first time Keith Richards has given up a night's sleep, but it may have been one of the more ...

Talking Heads: 1999 – Not So Eighties, After All

Report by Jaan Uhelszki, Rolling Stone, April 1999

David Byrne joins his fellow Talking Heads ...

Ron Sexsmith: Whereabouts

Review by Barney Hoskyns, Rolling Stone, June 1999

THAT THE TERM "singer-songwriter" is no longer one of abuse is at least partly because of the excellent Ron Sexsmith. A thirtysomething Canadian who sounds ...

Jackson Browne: For Everyman

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, August 1999

THE TITLE TRACK of Jackson Browne's second album, For Everyman, was a response to the escapist vision of Crosby, Stills and Nash's 'Wooden Ships'. As ...

Cher: Live At Arrowhead Pond, Anaheim, California, August 20th, 1999

Live Review by Erik Himmelsbach, Rolling Stone, September 1999

BY EMBRACING her inner Studio 54, Cher recently landed the biggest hit of her four-decade career with the dance-house thumper ‘Believe’. Her mammoth stage show, ...

Elvis Costello: Fathers & Sons: The Costellos

Interview by Fred Schruers, Rolling Stone, November 1999

DECLAN MACMANUS took to the stage in 1977, an angry young man sporting Buddy Holly glasses and a strange name: Elvis Costello. But he wasn't ...

The Eagles, Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt: The Eagles/Jackson Browne/Linda Ronstadt: Live at Staples Center, Los Angeles

Live Review by Erik Himmelsbach, Rolling Stone, February 2000

THE KINGS of Country Rock have been on ice for the better part of two decades. Still, they earned most of their reported $7 million ...

Aimee Mann, Michael Penn: Aimee Mann and Michael Penn

Interview by Erik Himmelsbach, Rolling Stone, March 2000

In which two of L.A.’s best songwriters get dumped by their labels, get married and live happily ever after. ...

Buffalo Springfield: Will Buffalo Springfield Roam Again?

Live Review by Charles Bermant, Rolling Stone, April 2000

NEIL YOUNG'S NEW album, Silver and Gold, features a plaintive ballad titled 'Buffalo Springfield Again', where he expresses nostalgia for the band that first put ...

Don Henley: Inside Job

Review by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, June 2000

On his first two solo albums (I Can't Stand Still and Building the Perfect Beast), Don Henley made yearning his great theme. Something had disappeared ...

Wu-Tang Clan Take L.A. On New Album

Interview by Marc Weingarten, Rolling Stone, August 2000

In the studio with the Wu-Tang Clan ...

Pearl Jam: Live in Europe 1-25

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, October 2000

PEARL JAM's late-spring 2000 tour is remembered for the mosh-pit tragedy that claimed the lives of nine fans in Denmark. But up until then, the ...

Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne: Jackson Browne and Bonnie Raitt: Rock for Java

Live Review by Charles Bermant, Rolling Stone, June 2001

BACK IN THE 1970s, when Jackson Browne and Bonnie Raitt became notorious for spearheading benefit concerts, the issues were, well, more clear cut: Vote for ...

Iggy Pop: The Importance of Being Iggy

Interview by Jaan Uhelszki, Rolling Stone, July 2001

JAMES NEWELL OSTERBERG, a.k.a. Iggy Pop, once billed himself as the "world's forgotten boy," but that is no longer the case. From fronting the proto-punk ...

Buffalo Springfield: The Box Set

Review by Ben Edmonds, Rolling Stone, July 2001

BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD are that rarest of beasts: an influential 1960s band whose recorded legacy hasn't been recycled into dust. Classic-rock radio stations don't dig much ...

The Kinks: Ray Davies: Rocking My Life Away

Interview by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, March 2002

Lost Davies interview illuminates the "underrated" Kinks ...

Michael Jackson: Michael Reinvents Pop

Retrospective by Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone, August 2009

Recorded before he turned 21, Off The Wall made him a superstar — and the most important young R&B artist in America. ...

Arcade Fire Go Big at Madison Square Garden

Live Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, August 2010

A FEW YEARS BACK, U2 used Arcade Fire's recording of 'Wake Up' to pump up arena crowds before they hit the stage. ...

Adele: 21

Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, February 2011

ADELE ADKINS' retro-soul debut, 19, was striking less for her songs than for that voice: a voluptuous, slightly parched alto that swooped and fluttered like a ...

The Black Keys: El Camino

Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, December 2011

OVER 10 YEARS and seven albums, Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney have turned their basement blues project into one of America's mightiest bands. ...

Ellie Goulding: Halcyon

Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, October 2012

ELLIE GOULDING emerged in 2010 with a one-two punch: first, her (still-rising) helium-voiced hit 'Lights', then, an elegant read of Elton John's 'Your Song' that ...

Alabama Shakes' Unlikely Triumph

Interview by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, March 2013

BRITTANY HOWARD, the powerhouse 24-year-old frontwoman for Alabama Shakes, isn't much for red carpets. ...

Daft Punk: Random Access Memories

Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, May 2013

FRENCH DUO Daft Punk helped create our current stadium-shaking, Coachella-dominating dance-music moment, and their new album is by far the year's most anticipated EDM set. ...

M.I.A.: Matangi (Interscope)

Review by Will Hermes, Rolling Stone, November 2013

IF MAYA ARULPRAGASAM has a persecution complex, she's earned it. ...

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