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Ohio Players, The

Ohio Players, The

ARTICLES IN LIBRARY

Ohio Players: Fiery, Freaky and Funky

Profile by Bob Fisher, NME, February 1975

CURRENTLY THE HOTTEST item on Billboard's album chart is The Ohio Players Fire (Mercury). Phonogram must have burnt their fingers in the rush get it ...

The Ohio Players: Honey

Report and Interview by John Abbey, Blues & Soul, July 1975

OVER THE past year or so, I can't think of a group who has made as much impact on our music as the Ohio Players. ...

The Ohio Players - Honey

Review by Cliff White, NME, September 1975

EARLIER THIS YEAR Ralph 'Pee Wee' Middlebrook, trumpeter with The Players, admitted in an interview "now we've made it after all that scuffling I suppose ...

Kool and the Gang: Spirit Of The Boogie; Ohio Players: Honey

Review by Richard Williams, Let It Rock, December 1975

OCCUPYING ROUGHLY the same area in the impressively wide spectrum of contemporary Black music, these two orchestras both play for dancers but nevertheless perform entirely ...

The Ohio Players: The Spirit of '76

Interview by John Abbey, Blues & Soul, July 1976

IT HAD to be more than just coincidence. Here I was in Ohio Player Satch Satchell's luxurious hotel suite overlooking Grosvenor Square writing for our ...

War & The Ohio Players: Say It Loud, I'm Black an' My Bank Manager's Proud

Profile and Interview by Cliff White, NME, July 1976

WAR and THE OHIO PLAYERS fall into a similar category –- two flash, young(ish) outfits with artistic and financial freedom and an interesting line in ...

Ohio Players Come Out Of Hibernation

Interview by John Abbey, Blues & Soul, August 1978

John Abbey talks to Satch Satchell, the Ohio Players' spiritual leader. ...

The Ohio Players: Up An' Dancin'

Report and Interview by John Abbey, Blues & Soul, June 1979

"Arista are famous for their pre-programming scheme and they could afford us!" ...

In Pursuit Of The Pimp Mobile

Essay by James Maycock, Nine, October 2002

A look at how black pimp culture has crossed into black popular culture, for which I interviewed Antonio Fargas. I refer to Miles Davis, the ...

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