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Ken Barnes

Ken Barnes

I began writing for Phonograph Record Magazine and Fusion in late 1971, thanks to the kindness and receptivity of (respectively) Marty Cerf and Gary Kenton. Shortly thereafter I got in contact with Greg Shaw, leading to my becoming co-editor of his pioneering fanzine Who Put the Bomp in 1973, around which time I also became an editor of Phonograph Record. I also wrote for Rolling Stone and CREEM and Alan Betrock's Rock Marketplace, and started a long-running singles column that ran successively (under different names) in New York Rocker, CREEM and Rock & Roll Confidential from approximately 1977 to 1991.

For actual income I worked at music-industry trade weekly Radio & Records for nearly 20 years, eventually becoming editor-in-chief. Later I was an editor at Microsoft's first dedicated music website, Music Central, in the mid-'90s, and was music editor at USA Today from 1998-2008. Currently I write about music on TV for MSN Music and USA Today, and contribute to Ugly Things.

List of articles in the library by artist

10cc: The Original Soundtrack

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1975

10cc's Original Soundtrack is a fascinating record. Musically there's more going on than in ten Yes albums, yet it's generally as accessible as a straight ...

10cc: 10cc

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, 1973

WITH THIS DEBUT ALBUM, 10cc are well on their way to becoming the true studio wizards of the seventies. It's a startling record, bursting with ...

ABBA: Waterloo

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, August 1974

Abba's emergence is one of the most cheering musical events in recent months. Just when the Top 40 was plumbing hitherto-unfathomable, moribund depths, along came ...

ABBA: Abba: Mamas & Papas of the '70's

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, November 1976

LOS ANGELES – The hottest group in the world recently flew into town, but only a scattered few knew they were even here. ...

The Archies, Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart, Tommy James & the Shondells: Bubblegum: A Beginners' Guide

Guide by Ken Barnes, Let It Rock, December 1975

ARCHIES: As the Monkees started to slip in late '68, Don Kirshner unveiled his new media blitz – a cartoon show (based on a popular ...

Argent: All Together Now

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1972

ARGENT (THE BAND) is an emphatically annoying enigma. ...

Argent, Colin Blunstone, The Zombies: The Zombies

Retrospective by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, June 1973

AS ONE of Britain's most undervalued and undeservedly unsuccessful groups, the Zombies have a lot of historical recompense coming. Furthermore, with two offshoots (Argent and ...

Artful Dodger: Artful Dodger

Comment by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1975

PLAYING straight uncomplicated hard rock, without a unified theme or specific image, without fantastic flights of lyrical invention or instrumental improvisation, and without pandering to ...

Badfinger: Wish You Were Here

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, November 1974

BADFINGER HAVE finally made the album I always hoped they would – an album whose tracks all match the standards of their brilliant Apple singles. ...

The Band, Bob Dylan: Bob Dylan & The Band: The Basement Tapes

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1975

WHAT WE HAVE here is the most enjoyable Dylan album yet released. ...

The Beach Boys: Carl And The Passions – So Tough (Reprise)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1972

It's become increasingly evident that the Beach Boys are dead serious about shedding their hedonistic California surf-cars-and-fun stand for a more "contemporary" image. Surf's Up ...

The Beach Boys: A California Saga

Essay by Gene Sculatti, Greg Shaw, Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1973

The Revival of Coastal Consciousness featuring The Beach Boys, Dean Torrance, California, American Spring ...

The Beach Boys: America Celebrates

Report by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, June 1976

"This is gonna be the most outrageous summer story of all"– Mike Love ...

The Beau Brummels: The Beau Brummels (Warner Bros.)

Review by Ken Barnes, Creem, August 1975

THE BEAU BRUMMELS weren't the most eagerly anticipated reunion band, but they're the first to equal their earlier standards, an accomplishment the Byrds, Love, Spirit, ...

The Bee Gees: Bee Gees: Main Course

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1975

FOR THE BEE GEES, "change is now," as the Byrds expressed it on the backside of their 1967 mid-charter 'Goin' Back' (Columbia 44362). ...

Blue Ash: No More, No Less

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, July 1973

SINCE 1968 and the ascension of Cream and Hendrix to godhead status, rock has been ruled by tedious variations on their initial improvisatory explorations. ...

Blue Oyster Cult: Agents Of Fortune

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, June 1976

NO MATTER HOW predictable rock seems to become, it can still surprise you, and I've got to admit to being surprised as hell by the ...

Colin Blunstone: One Year (Epic)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, April 1972

COLIN BLUNSTONE sang all those unforgettable Zombies hits, made a couple fairly successful solo singles, and disappeared for about three years before finally re-emerging with ...

Brownsville Station: School Punks

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, August 1974

THIS IS AN IMPORTANT album. It's a good album, too, but even if it were terrible, it would still be important. ...

Tim Buckley: Greetings from L.A. (Straight)

Review by Ken Barnes, Creem, December 1972

IT'S BEEN ABOUT two years now since Tim Buckley has had an album out. ...

The Carpenters: Horizon

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1975

IT'S CERTAINLY LESS than revolutionary to admit you like the Carpenters these days (in ‘rock’ circles, if you recall, it formerly bordered on heresy). Everybody ...

Chris Spedding, The Clash, The Count Bishops, The Damned, Elvis Costello, Flo & Eddie, Little Bob Story, The Sex Pistols, The Stranglers, The Vibrators: Blind Date with Flo & Eddie

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1977

A monthly blindfold test by those masters of Slander Rock, Mark Volman & Howard Kaylan ...

Eric Clapton: There's One In Every Crowd

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1975

IT NEVER CEASES to amaze me – the sycophantic lengths so many "critics" go to in hyping the fashionable superstars' records. ...

Jimmy Cliff: Struggling Man (Island)/ Music Maker (Reprise)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, August 1974

LAST YEAR, 'the word' was that reggae was all set to become the next big thing. Once radio program directors and listeners heard that irresistibly ...

Alice Cooper: The Forum, Los Angeles

Live Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1975

WHEN ALICE CAME back to the Forum, it was an owning-up of sorts. This time there were no pretenses of Rock Band Identity (the backing ...

Burton Cummings: My Own Way To Rock

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, June 1977

BURTON CUMMINGS is destined to be a solo star, if he isn't classifiable as one already. His first single apart from the Guess Who, 'Stand ...

Burton Cummings, The Guess Who: Burton Cummings, Legitimate

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1976

VANCOUVER – For perhaps the fifth time in 20 minutes, the phone in Burton Cummings' Vancouver hotel suite rings, cutting the artist off in mid-answer. ...

Deep Purple: Burn

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, April 1974

DEEP PURPLE'S first album since last year's departure of vocalist Ian Gillan and bassist/composer Roger Glover is a passable but disappointing effort. ...

Sandy Denny: Sandy

Review by Ken Barnes, Music World, April 1973

THE SINGER/SONGWRITER boom is still rolling merrily along, but some of the most brilliant artists in the genre have failed to break through thus far. ...

Lynsey De Paul: Love Bomb

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, January 1976

LYNSEY DE PAUL'S new Aimed-at-America image seems to be Sex & Sleaze – with class. Visually, as any potential consumer can see by directing an ...

Dion Bounces Back

Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, August 1976

MIAMI, FLA. – "Frankie Valii turned my head around. I was in Westbury (Conn.), where he was playing, and he said, 'Watch, this.' He introduced ...

Electric Light Orchestra: The Electric Light Orchestra at St Louis

Live Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1973

The mere fact of their actual appearance was probably sufficient for most diehard Move-ELO fans, but the Electric Light Orchestra turned in an adventurous, hard-rocking ...

Electric Light Orchestra: The Electric Light Orchestra: Eldorado

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, January 1975

THE ELECTRIC LIGHT Orchestra has sometimes swamped itself in grandiose conceptions, and Eldorado (A Symphony) sounds like a prime opportunity to do it again. But ...

John Entwistle: John Entwhistle: Mad Dog

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1975

Mad Dog is everything you'd expect from a John Entwhistle album – and more. It catches Entwhistle in rabid transit, combining his obsession with 50's/early ...

Phil Everly: Phil's Diner

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1975

THE PAST THREE years have seen comebacks by Jerry Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry, Rick Nelson, Neil Sedaka, Paul Anka and more. ...

Fairport Convention: Babbacombe Lee

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, April 1972

FOR THEIR SEVENTH album, Fairport Convention has presented us with a "concept" or "unified theme" LP (avoiding the oppro-briously-connotated term "rock opera"). ...

Fairport Convention, The Strawbs: The Strawbs: Hero and Heroine; Fairport Convention: Nine

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, September 1974

The Strawbs and Fairport Convention are conveniently linked by their past importance in modernizing the British folk scene (and their use, at different times, of ...

Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids: Flash Cadillac: Sons Of The Beaches

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1975

THEY'VE DONE IT again, and it's starting to get annoying. OK, Flash Cadillac & the Continental Kids are great – leagues ahead of any other ...

Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids: Flash Cadillac: There's No Face like Chrome

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, July 1974

FLASH CADILLAC & the Continental Kids have been identified with a stale spate of revivalist Fifties bands – even though their live performances prove they ...

Fleetwood Mac: Universal Amphitheatre, L.A./Sunday Break II, Austin, Texas

Live Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, October 1976

FOR FLEETWOOD MAC success is in the bag, and the bag is soft-rock. Progressive MOR, MOR/progressive, whatever your preference, it's the new formula for wide-acceptance ...

Flo & Eddie's Media Mania

Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, August 1974

WHEN WE LAST left our heroes Flo and Eddie (PRM September '73), they were poised on the brink of substantial obscurity. ...

Flo & Eddie: Flo and Eddie: Flo and Eddie

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1973

Flo & Eddie's second album is a much more complex undertaking than their first and for the most part it succeeds admirably. Where Kaylan and ...

Peter Frampton: Something's Happening

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, May 1974

PETER FRAMPTON has become a highly stylized performer. The songs on his new album sound much the same as the material on two earlier solo ...

Geordie: Hope You Like It

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1973

DESPITE THEIR apparent failure to storm the States, Slade's influence has been felt here – chiefly at, of all places, MGM Records. ...

Gary Glitter, Slade, Suzi Quatro, Sweet, T. Rex: The Glitter Era: Teenage Rampage

Overview by Ken Barnes, Bomp!, March 1978

JUST THREE YEARS gone and it already seems so quaint. The time was c. 1971-1974, the place England, the sound "glitter," or "Glitter Rock." ...

Grand Funk Railroad: All The Girls In The World Beware

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, March 1975

IT'S A MEASURE OF Grand Funk's less than overwhelming critical acceptance that the chief topic of interest for most reviewers has been the band's current ...

Ellie Greenwich: Let It Be Written Let It Be Sung

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, July 1973

A NEW ELLIE GREENWICH album won't provoke Pavlovian ecstasy among the masses, but the news will intrigue a certain hard corps of faithful girl-group fanatics. ...

Grin: All Out

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1973

GRIN HAS DONE it again. Following up 1+1, one of the most exciting album of '72, the new opus from Nils Lofgren & Co., ALL ...

Grin: Gone Crazy

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, February 1974

NILS LOFGREN, a superb songwriter, possesses an appealing vocal style and is a fine guitarist. On the strength first three albums it’s unbelievable that he ...

The Guess Who: Road Food

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1974

DISMISSED by snobbish critics as a clockwork singles machine, the Guess Who have continued selling albums and filling concert halls even after the hits stopped ...

Albert Hammond: Free Electric Band

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1973

ALBERT HAMMOND, despite his recent ascension to the pop limelight, is no overnight phenom. ...

Heart: Little Queen

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, June 1977

IF ANY DOUBT still existed about Heart's big-league credentials, the first notes of ‘Barracuda’ should dispel them forever. Roger Fisher slams into a bonecrunching guitar ...

Heart: Seattle's Hard Rock Girls

Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, October 1976

WITNESSING A ROCK band, Heart, genuinely excited about things – they mention how much they love to hear their records on the radio – is ...

The Hollies Revisited

Retrospective by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, August 1972

The Hollies Are Back Again ...

The Hollies: Romany

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1973

THE HOLLIES ARE nothing if not resilient. When Graham Nash (long regarded as the key member of the group) left, Allan Clarke and Tony Hicks ...

The Hudson Brothers: A Real Life Drama Starring The Hudson Brothers

Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, January 1975

KEEP YOUR EYE on the Hudson Brothers. They're probably the most exciting new act of the year. Out of thin air, they've presented us with ...

The Hudson Brothers: Totally Out of Control (Rocket)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1974

NOW THAT ‘So You Are a Star’ is making stars out of the Hudson Brothers, their earlier recordings are coming out of the woodwork like ...

Hunter-Ronson, Ian Hunter, Mick Ronson: Hunter-Ronson: The Ashes Of Mott Comes The Phoenix Rise

Report and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, June 1975

"SINCE YOU'VE BEEN such a quiet, well-behaved audience tonight, we'd like to send you off a nice, soothing lullaby..." ...

Tommy James & the Shondells: Tommy James: The Troubadour, Los Angeles

Live Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, August 1976

IT WAS INCREDIBLY good and it was incredibly frustrating. Tommy James was stunning. As a terminally addicted Top 40 fetishist I've come to expect the ...

Jan & Dean: Dean Torrence

Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1975

CAN YOU BELIEVE IT? Third year in a row Phonograph's run a surf revival story, as if it were a current event. Looks pretty suspicious ...

The Kinks: Preservation Act 1

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, February 1974

THE KINKS traditionally stand as preservers of the eternal verities of their Village Green, fighting off the depredations of predatory capitalists in their dapper demolition ...

The Kinks: Schoolboys In Disgrace

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1975

RAY DAVIES' NEWEST philosophical treatise directs itself to the topic of education and schooldays nostalgia. While a plot of sorts is undraped at the beginning ...

The Left Banke, Stories: The Left Banke and Stories : The Michael Brown Story

Profile by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1973

THE ALBUM DEBUT of Stories was one of the most exciting musical events of 1972. A number of excellent LP's in a new American lightweight ...

Nils Lofgren: Nils Lofgren (A&M)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, February 1975

WELL, THIS IS more like it. Nils Lofgren, in his first solo attempt, has come up with a smashing album that restores him to the ...

Nils Lofgren: Can He Beat The Press

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1976

NILS LOFGREN, AS SHAMEFULLY under-appreciated a top-flight rock & roller as America has ever spawned, now finds himself suffering, ironically, from overappreciation from certain sectors ...

Love: Reel to Real

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, January 1975

ARTHUR LEE and Love have an albatross around their necks: their nearly perfect 1968 album, Forever Changes, a never equaled distillation of smooth pop and ...

Lynyrd Skynyrd: Gimme Back My Bullets

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1976

LYNYRD SKYNYRD are fast becoming one of my favorite American bands, in part because they're starting to sound so British. ...

The Monkees: Monkee-Mania... In The '70s?

Retrospective by Ken Barnes, Who Put The Bomp!, 1976

I WROTE A prototype version of this piece in 1973, at a time when admitting you liked the Monkees was about as cool as driving ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott the Hoople: Mott The Hoople Live (Columbia)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, January 1975

IF YOU HAVEN'T heard already, this album's a scorcher. Offhand I can't think of a live album that tops Mott's 50-minute opus here, but I'm ...

Mott The Hoople: The Complete History of Mott The Hoople

Profile by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, February 1973

IN THE WAKE of their first hit single, Mott The Hoople have begun to generate a publicity splash of sorts. It hasn't hurt that rock ...

Nazareth: Close Enough For Rock & Roll

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1976

Close Enough For Rock & Roll, due for release in the near future, is more of the same for Nazareth. That is to say, out ...

Nazareth: Razamanaz

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1973

WHILE AMERICA continues to wallow in endless overblown funk, monotonous middle-of-the-rodomontade, and the unceasing soporifics of multitudinous mellow fellows and laid-back lasses, they've really been ...

Nazareth: Pulling Into Nazareth

Retrospective by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1976

IT'S ALMOST schizophrenic. On the one side there's Nazareth the loud, flashy, hard-rocking boogie band. That's more or less their reputation in England, where they've ...

The Outlaws: Outlaws

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1974

GOOD NEW rock & roll bands, without frills, excesses, or hyphenated stylistic cross-pollenizations are getting scarcer all the time. That's why discovering the Outlaws is ...

Patto: Roll 'Em Smoke 'Em Put Another Line Out

Review by Ken Barnes, Fusion, February 1973

PATTO'S THIRD ALBUM is something different. Not different than their last release, Hold Your Fire, which is fairly similar stylistically, but very distinctive indeed in ...

Pentangle: Reflection

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1971

THE APPEARANCE on the display wall of my favorite local record merchant of Pentangle's fifth album, Reflections, triggered a lightning search of my wallet, pockets, ...

Piper: Can't Wait

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, August 1977

BY THE TIME the first two cuts on Piper's second album had finished, I thought they'd really done it. 'Can't Wait' and especially 'Drop By ...

Gary Wright, Procol Harum: Procol Harum: Procol's Ninth; Gary Wright: Dream Weaver

Review by Ken Barnes, Creem, November 1975

AFTER EIGHT albums with only minor format variations, Procol Harum seemed to be a predictable institution that may have outlived its usefulness. ...

Suzi Quatro: Quatro

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1974

ALTHOUGH SUZI QUATRO exploded in Britain and to an extent in the States with all the sociomusical force of a full-fledged phenomenon, album No. 2 ...

The Raspberries: Starting Over

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, October 1974

THE RASPBERRIES have at last realized their potential. They've clearly become the premier synthesizers of Sixties pop influences, extant. Even more importantly, the end results ...

Terry Reid: River

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1973

IT'S BEEN three-and-a-half years since Terry Reid released his last album. At the time he looked like an emerging talent, with extraordinary voice, wild and ...

Paul Revere & The Raiders

Retrospective by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1973

IF THERE ARE still any doubts in your mind about the deterioration of AM radio (pop music's most immediate barometer) since, say, 1966, a glance ...

Johnny Rivers: Blue Suede Shoes

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1973

SIDE ONE OF Johnny Rivers' BLUE SUEDE SHOES album is the best work he's recorded in a long and often illustrious career. ...

Roxy Music: Stranded (Atlantic)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, April 1974

THOUGH I LIKED the first two Roxy Music albums reasonably well, Stranded is the first one that's immediately impressed me. ...

The Rubinoos: The Rubinoos

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1977

THE RUBINOOS, Beserkley Records' hot new quartet of Bay Area teenagers, lead off their debut album with a new version of Tommy James' 1967 classic ...

Todd Rundgren: Initiation

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1975

INITIATION IS A RECORD in two senses of the word. That is to say, it's a world record, as Todd Rundgren has been at pains ...

John Sebastian: Welcome Back Hits

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1976

"I DID DOZE OFF for a long while." John Sebastian speaking, summing up his last few years. Up until a few weeks ago, that's ...

Bob Seger: Beautiful Loser

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1975

BOB SEGER is a superb songwriter and Midwestern rocker who's been ignored for far too long. He had a hit, 'Ramblin' Gamblin' Man' in 1968, ...

Del Shannon: Rock's Runaway Returns

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, April 1975

THEY'RE ALL COMING back. Sedaka, Anka and Vinton hit the top of the charts again, but you all know that story backwards and forwards. Almost ...

Slade: Stomp Your Hands And Clap Your Feet

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, April 1974

I've been behind Slade's records 100% since I first heard them, but with this album the backing percentage has doubled. It's a terrific album, with ...

Sparks: Propaganda

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, April 1975

ON THEIR NOW obscure Warner Bros.' albums Sparks's intriguing lyrics and immaculate conceptions were undermined by inadequate musical constructions. ...

Starry-Eyed And Laughing: Starry-Eyed and Laughing: Starry-Eyed and Laughing

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1975

THIS ALBUM was preceded by a year-long barrage of hype, emanating from England, revolving around the band's stylistic similarities to the early Byrds. ...

Cat Stevens: Foreigner

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, October 1973

IN ANY NORMAL TIME, Cat Stevens would be nothing more than an occasionally annoying inconsequentiality; but in an appalling era of innumerable idiot-savant singer/songwriters elevated ...

Rod Stewart: Never A Dull Moment

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1972

WELL, IT TOOK AWHILE, but Rod Stewart is back again with his fourth straight formula solo album. He's rounded up roughly the same crew of ...

Stories: Stories

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, July 1972

ONCE MICHAEL BROWN led a group called the Left Banke, who produced two of the most memorable singles of the mid-sixties, 'Walk Away Renee' and ...

Stories: The Warehouse, New Orleans

Live Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, October 1973

STORIES MADE their first New Orleans concert appearance recently in the incongruous company of yet another Southern Allmanesque boogie band, the Marshall Tucker aggregation, and ...

Sutherland Brothers and Quiver: Sutherland Bros: Beat Of The Street

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, February 1975

THEY OPEN WITH a knockout and close like gangbusters. ‘World in Action’ is an energy-overload rocker with a great bridge over doubled wattage, an electrifying ...

Sutherland Brothers and Quiver: Sutherland Bros: Starting Over Again

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1976

A LITTLE HISTORY first. Not too much, don't worry; this isn't one of my retrospective tomes. The group is called the Sutherland Bros. & Quiver ...

Sutherland Brothers and Quiver: Sutherland Brothers: Reach For The Sky

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, March 1976

POSITIVE NOTES FIRST. Of the four Sutherland Bros. & Quiver albums, Reach For the Sky is definitely the most consistent, the strongest yet. ...

Sweet: Glitter Relics In America

Overview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, October 1975

"THAT WAS 'Ballroom Blitz' by the Sweet! Hard to believe that's the same group that did 'Little Willy' a couple years ago!" – Southern California ...

Them, The Who: The Who: Odds & Sods/Them: Backtrackin'

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, November 1974

1974 HAS CERTAINLY been a good year for reissues, even if UA's Jan & Dean set didn't quite make it to the starting gate. Four ...

The Tremeloes: Tremeloes: Even the Bad Times are Good

Report by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1976

THE TREMELOES have a problem – they've been too successful. 15 years together (the first five, backing Brian Poole) and upwards of a dozen pop ...

Robin Trower: Twice Removed From Yesterday

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1973

ROBIN TROWER left Procol Harum well over a year ago, after their BROKEN BARRICADES LP, and has now surfaced with an album and a group ...

Tanya Tucker: Delta Dawn, What's Your Mama's Name (Columbia)

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, November 1973

TANYA TUCKER just turned fifteen years old and, as they say, she's taken the country music world by storm. Her first hit, 'Delta Dawn', went ...

The Turtles, featuring Flo & Eddie

Profile and Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1973

FLO & EDDIE are well-known (if rather rotund) figures; their supporting role in the colossal Alice Cooper psychodrama alone assured them a massive national audience. ...

Dwight Twilley: The Dwight Twilley Band

Interview by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, September 1975

ONCE IN A WHILE a single hits the radio and hooks you immediately. They come out of nowhere, seemingly – happens to me every so ...

Velvet Underground: 1969 — The Velvet Underground Live

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1974

THE LAST YEAR has seen sufficient scholarly exegeses on the subject of Lou Reed to see us through the decade; and the release of 1969, ...

Bob Weir: Ace (Warner Bros.)

Review by Ken Barnes, Creem, October 1972

FOLLOWING THE release of the New Riders Of The Purple Sage with Jerry Garcia, the Vintage Dead albums, the second double live Dead package, the ...

Ian Whitcomb: The Ian Whitcomb Story

Profile by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, April 1973

IAN WHITCOMB WAS certainly one of the more obscure figures of that gloriously mythologized pop explosion known as the British Invasion. ...

The Who: The Who By Numbers

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, October 1975

THE WHO'S sovereign elixir is only available about once every two years, and is held most effective when composed of simple, basic ingredients. The 1969 ...

The Winkies: The Winkies

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1975

THIS MONTH'S import special features a group with a dumb name that sounds like a cross between a marine crustacean and a Hostess snack cake ...

Yes: Relayer and Yesterdays

Review by Ken Barnes, Rolling Stone, June 1975

WITH THEIR LAST five albums (including Relayer) reaching Top Five status, Yes are central to the new British Invasion. ...

Neil Young: Zuma

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1975

Now I remember why I used to rave about Neil Young... ...

The Zombies: Time Of The Zombies

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, May 1974

THANKS TO THE SUCCESS of Argent, Colin Blunstone, and the 'Monster Mash', the long-neglected Zombies are again coming to light. London's fluke smash with the ...

List of genre pieces

Various Artists: Mersey Beat ’62-‘64

Review by Ken Barnes, Phonograph Record, December 1974

IN THE LITANY of wondrous 1974 reissues which led off my review of Odds & Sods/Backtrackin' last issue, I neglected to shower proper praises on ...

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