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Tony Scherman

Tony Scherman

Tony Scherman has been a journalist and non-fiction author since the early 1980s. A former boss, Bill Flanagan, now Executive Vice President of MTV, wrote that "Tony Scherman is one of the best pure writers ever to come out of music journalism". He has written for dozens of magazines, and his two books are Backbeat: Earl Palmer’s Story (1999) and POP: The Genius of Andy Warhol (2009). His work has been widely anthologized.

13 articles

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List of articles in the library by artist

Dennis Chambers' Pillow Talk

Interview by Tony Scherman, Musician, May 1992

The bedroom secrets of a drummer's hands ...

Ry Cooder, Jim Dickinson, Green On Red, The Replacements: Jim Dickinson and the New Low-Fi

Interview by Tony Scherman, Musician, November 1987

Wherein a dangerous redneck weirdo becomes studio godfather to post-punk's finest. ...

Taj Mahal: In Progress and Motion (Columbia/Legacy)

Review by Tony Scherman, New York Times, The, 29 November 1998

EMERGING IN THE late '60s as an anomaly – one of the few young black musicians to embrace the folk-blues revival – Taj Mahal flirted ...

Bill Monroe: Before Bluegrass, Bill Monroe Was Already a Star

Retrospective by Tony Scherman, New York Times, The, July 2000

SO CLOSELY IS the late Bill Monroe identified with his musical creation, bluegrass, that it's almost as if man and music called each other into ...

Geoff Muldaur: The Secret Handshake

Review by Tony Scherman, New York Times, The, 13 December 1998

"THE WHITE MAN cannot vocal the blues,'' said the blues singer Muddy Waters with grave finality, and his maxim has only rarely been disproved. ...

Stevie Ray Vaughan: Lost and Found and Lost Again: Stevie Ray Vaughan 1954-1990

Retrospective by Tony Scherman, Musician, November 1990

"STEVIE WAS on it. Playin' great, kickin' butt," says Robert Cray, and when Double Trouble was done, everybody — the Vaughan brothers, Cray, Buddy Guy ...

Chris Whitley: A Latter-Day Folkie Gets Noisy

Profile and Interview by Tony Scherman, New York Times, The, 26 March 1995

THE ROCKER TODAY whose music evokes Jimi Hendrix's splendid noise more powerfully than anyone else's is Chris Whitley – an improbable claim, given Mr. Whitley's ...

Tony Williams Reinvents Himself

Interview by Tony Scherman, Musician, June 1991

Can't stop worrying, can't stop growing. The world's best drummer turns to composing. ...

Steve Winwood: The Lord-Alge Brothers — The First Family of Engineering

Interview by Tony Scherman, Musician, March 1988

The three stooges of the studio get the last laugh. ...

ZZ Top: Front Man: Billy Gibbons

Interview by Tony Scherman, Musician, November 1990

DID YOU ever play with Stevie Ray? Of course. [ZZ Top's] Frank and Dusty grew up with him in Dallas, and just this morning we ...

ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons (1990)

Interview by Tony Scherman, Rock's Backpages Audio, August 1990

The hirsute guitar wonder starts off with memories of recently-deceased fellow Texan Stevie Ray Vaughan, then discusses the new ZZ Top album Recycler... plus the trio's return to a rootsier sound; the technology used on preceding albums Eliminator and Afterburner; the place of the blues in today's music; and getting to play cards with Muddy Waters.

File format: mp3; file size: 23.8mb, interview length: 24' 48" sound quality: ***

List of genre pieces

Earl Palmer, Dave Bartholomew and Alvin "Red" Tyler (1997)

Interview by Tony Scherman, Rock's Backpages Audio, March 1997

Three giants of New Orleans R&B — bandleader Bartholomew, drummer Palmer and sax player Tyler — look back on the days on the bandstand and NOLA studios: on recording with Fats Domino and Little Richard; on the characters — Lightnin' Slim, the unlucky Smiley Lewis and more; on hassles with the Musicians' Union; on Palmer leaving for L.A.; on squeezing in bebop; on the beloved Dew Drop Inn... and what made the Crescent City sound. [NOTE: The most audibly prominent voice belongs to Tyler, with Palmer's the most distant. Bartholomew's is somewhere in the middle, with the deepest register.]

File format: mp3; file size: 94.7mb, interview length: 1h 38' 35" sound quality: ***

Strike the Band: Pop Music Without Musicians

Report and Interview by Tony Scherman, New York Times, The, 10 February 2001

IN THE 1950s and '60s, the recording studio became an instrument. From its humble origins documenting live performances, the studio turned into a music-maker itself, ...

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