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Bud Scoppa

Bud Scoppa

Bud Scoppa’s multifaceted four-decade career has encompassed writing about pop music, editing music mags and working in the music business, primarily in an A&R capacity.

Over the years, the veteran journalist has contributed to virtually every major music publication, including Rolling Stone, Creem, Rock, Fusion, Crawdaddy! and Phonograph Record, while also doing stints as the editor of Music Connection, Cash Box and Hits. When not writing about music, he was helping to create it at the Mercury, A&M, Arista, Zoo, Discovery and Sire labels.

He authored the long-out-of-print paperbacks The Byrds (Scholastic, 1971, priced at 75 cents but now fetching prices in the $8 range on eBay) and The Rock People (Scholastic, 1972; collected interviews) and penned the liner notes for Rhino’s Little Feat box set Hotcakes and Outtakes (2000), for which he received a Grammy nomination (but lost to some guy who wrote about Miles Davis), as well as the notes for Columbia/Legacy's Simon & Garfunkel reissues (2001) and Rhino’s 40th anniversary Woodstock box (2009). His notes also accompany reissues and collections on Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Buddy Holly and the Easy Rider soundtrack.

Presently, Scoppa is senior editor at Hits and industry-news site hitsdailydouble.com. His current outlets include Uncut and Paste, while his work also appears in the School of Rock and Sound Of... sections of the iTunes Store. He blogs for rocksbackpages.com and his own budscorner (http://scoppaoohmaumau.blogspot.com)

Scoppa banged out his first record review in 1969; his initial outlets were Rock, Fusion and Crawdaddy! He was barely breaking even in this new pursuit until he discovered that he didn't actually have to buy the records he was reviewing. In his first label gig, working alongside his mentor, Paul Nelson, at Mercury, Scoppa was exposed firsthand to the idiosyncratic delights of the New York Dolls, Blue Ash, Doug Sahm and Jerry Lee Lewis. During that period, he moonlighted as a Rolling Stone reviewer, rhapsodizing about Big Star, Neil Young, Jackson Browne, Gram Parsons, Little Feat, Nick Drake, Harry Nilsson, the Eagles, Mott the Hoople and Brinsley Schwartz. Moving in the fall of 1973 from W. 57th St. to that Camelot on La Brea Ave., A&M Records, Scoppa worked with the Tubes, Nils Lofgren, Supertramp, Squeeze and George Harrison, while contributing to Rolling Stone, Phonograph Record and Creem.

A move to the West Coast office of Arista in 1978 coincided with the burgeoning skinny-tie movement, inspiring Scoppa to sign and A&R the Pop, the Bus Boys and Elton Duck; he also inherited the company's Lakers season tickets during Magic Johnson's rookie season, initiating a love affair with the team that continues unabated. He won some job security (but lost some credibility) by overnighting 'Lost in Love', an import single by Air Supply, to boss Clive Davis.

In 1983, Scoppa launched a career as a magazine editor, heading up the editorial staffs of Music Connection, Cash Box and Hits, before returning to labeldom in 1990 at startup Zoo Entertainment, where he signed and A&R'd Matthew Sweet, the Odds and Neal Casal. When Zoo hit the wall, Scoppa landed an A&R gig at Discovery Records, which morphed into Sire, where he signed Jolene and worked with Taxiride.

But Sire, like Zoo before it, began to unravel, so Scoppa returned to Hits at the beginning of the current millennium, becoming managing editor and a principal in the launch of hitsdailydouble.com, which is now bookmarked on the computers of thousands of music-biz toilers, while contributing to Rolling Stone, Paste, Tracks (RIP), Ice (ditto), Mix and Uncut. Fortunately, the records still come in the mail (in both physical and downloadable forms). And so it goes.

List of articles in the library by artist

10cc: How Dare You!

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, March 1976

In the February Esquire, Douglas Davis discusses the new meaning the word "tough" has taken on in photographic circles: "It has come to mean (particularly ...

801, Brian Eno, Phil Manzanera: Eno, Phil Manzanera et al.: 801 Live

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1977

I'D WAGER that the market for import albums is sustained primarily by fanciers of various exotic genres (Kraut-rock, pub-rock, punk-rock, zen-rock, bla-bla-bla). Some of this ...

Ace: Five-A-Side

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, April 1975

WHILE IT'S TEMPTING at first listening to lump Ace's first album with the Average White Band's AWB and then to make broad statements about the ...

Ace, Brinsley Schwarz, Dr. Feelgood, Ducks Deluxe: Pub Rock: Grass Roots On the Other Side of the Fence

Overview by Bud Scoppa, Crawdaddy!, October 1975

IN BRITAIN DURING the late '60s and early '70s, while rock 'n roll was being transformed into Big Business, a network of bands sprang up ...

Allman Brothers Band: Win, Lose or Draw

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, October 1975

The Allman Brothers haven't been behaving at all like one of the two or three biggest draws in rock & roll. From the lack of ...

Allman Brothers Band: The Allman Brothers Band: Brothers and Sisters

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1973

THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND's magic has always existed mainly on the concert stage, where it can engage its audience casually and cumulatively. The band's image, ...

Allman Brothers Band: The Allman Brothers Band: Brothers And Sisters

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1973

The Allman Brothers Band's magic has always existed mainly on the concert stage, where it can engage its audience casually and cumulatively. ...

The Alpha Band: The Alpha Band

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, November 1976

STEPHEN SOLES is a singer/writer/guitar-picker from NYC; he's the one Dylan kept whispering jokes to during the Hard Rain special. T-Bone Burnett is a Texan ...

The Amazing Rhythm Aces: Stacked Deck

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1975

‘THIRD RATE Romance’, an intriguing mystery on Jesse Winchester's '74 album, Learn to Love It, is no longer mysterious – the song's become a well-deserved ...

America: Holiday

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1974

MORE THAN any other group of the Seventies, America — in both its British and U.S. periods—has epitomized the stiff, soulless side of California pop. ...

Average White Band: Average White Band (MCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1974

If it wasn’t apparent from its first album (on MCA), it is from the second: Scotland’s Average White Band is one of the best self-contained ...

Bad Company: Bad Company

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1974

ON ITS FIRST album, Bad Company – led by former Free singer Paul Rodgers and original Mott the Hoople guitarist Mick Ralphs – resembles Free ...

Bad Company: Straight Shooter (Swan Song)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1975

Bad Company came in with a literal bang: Simon Kirke’s drum-shot opening to ‘Can’t Get Enough’ (the first track on the first album, and subsequently ...

Badfinger: Ass (Apple)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1974

THE ALBUM TITLE is the band's reference to themselves as unwitting followers of some enticing but unrealizable dream, That dream may have been Badfinger's expectations ...

Badfinger: Wish You Were Here

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1975

UP TO NOW, the big singles, 'Come and Get It', 'No Matter What', 'Day After Day', and especially 'Baby Blue' have provided the obvious high ...

Band of Horses: Infinite Arms (Fat Possum/Columbia) *****

Review and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, June 2010

N.B. A revised version of the following review appeared in the June 2010 issue of Uncut. ...

The Beau Brummels: The Beau Brummels

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

I BOUGHT MY first two Sixties rock & roll albums, the Byrds' Mr. Tambourine Man and the debut LP of the Beau Brummels, at a ...

Big Stars In Their Eyes

Retrospective by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, May 2009

Note: I was assigned this piece in the Spring of 2000 by Revolver, but the mag was recast as a metal monthly while I was ...

Big Star: No.1 Record

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1973

In the late Sixties, a Memphis teenager named Alex Chilton won moderate fame and fortune as the lead singer for a sometimes inspired, sometimes insipid ...

Big Star: Radio City

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, March 1974

I HAVEN'T HEARD many albums in the last two years that I like as much as Big Star's first, Number One Record. Responsible for the ...

Big Star: Stars In Their Eyes: Big Star

Retrospective by Bud Scoppa, unpublished, 2000

NOTE: I was assigned this piece the spring of 2000 by Revolver, but the mag was recast as a metal monthly while I was working ...

Blue: Blue

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1973

SOME of the best recordings by the new generation of song-based groups have dealt overtly with Beatles music, the idea being that if you can't ...

Bon Iver: Bon Iver (Jagjaguwar)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, December 2011

ADOPTING THE nom de plume Bon Iver, Justin Vernon made the leap from unknown to major artist in the few seconds between the strummed acoustic ...

David Bowie: Low

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, February 1977

THE NEW BOWIE album doesn't make much sense. While practically everybody else in rock is striving for cleaner and more accurately recorded sound, Bowie's Low ...

Bonnie Bramlett: It's Time

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, February 1975

DELANEY & BONNIE made a bunch of fine records in rapid succession around the turn of the decade – if anything, the music on such ...

Bonnie Bramlett: Sweet Bonnie Bramlett

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1973

Right after switching labels, from Atlantic (which considered the increasingly temperamental pair more trouble than they were worth) to Columbia, the Bramletts separated. The expected ...

Brinsley Schwarz: Silver Pistol

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

SHADES OF Highway 61 Revisited, Sweetheart of the Rodeo, The Band, The Gilded Palace of Sin, Workingman's Dead were so integral a part of Brinsley ...

Jackson Browne: Jackson Browne

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1972

IT'S NOT OFTEN that a single album is sufficient to place a new performer among the first rank of recording artists. Jackson Browne's long-awaited debut ...

Jackson Browne: Late for the Sky (Asylum)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, December 1974

"IT’S ONLY a pop record – I know that," someone said to me about Late for the Sky. "So why does it affect me strongly?" ...

B.T. Express: BT Express: Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1975

DO IT ('Til You're Satisfied) resembles George McCrae's Rock Your Baby album in that it finds a persistent groove and stays with it unflaggingly from ...

The Byrds are Amazingly Graceful

Report and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Circus, September 1970

STUDIO B IS down the stark fluorescent-lit hall of the CBS Hollywood arsenal. Past the snack bar with its dozen vending machines, it is beyond ...

The Byrds: The Best of the Byrds (Greatest Hits, Volume II)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1973

IF YOU WERE asked to put together an anthology album of one of the longest-lived, most productive rock groups ever, and you had the total ...

The Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Gram Parsons: Gram Parsons, Track by Track

Sleevenotes by Bud Scoppa, Sacred Hearts and Fallen Angels (Rhino), September 2000

The International Submarine Band: Safe at Home ...

The Byrds, Matthew Sweet, R.E.M.: Byrd Brains: Matthew Sweet and R.E.M.’s Peter Buck Ponder Country-rock’s Finest

Review and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Revolver, Spring 2000

The Byrds:(Untitled/Unissued)ByrdmaniaxFarther AlongLive at the Fillmore West – February 1969 ...

The Cate Brothers: Cate Brothers

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1976

TEN YEARS AGO, Earl and Ernie Cate were playing the same Arkansas bars as Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks. While the Hawks have moved on ...

Cat Mother Cat Mother

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

WHEN THE members of Cat Mother had a house on East Tenth Street, the group got together with Jimi Hendrix, who was in a producing ...

Blondie Chaplin: Blondie Chaplin

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, April 1977

IF YOU CAN RESIST Blondie Chaplin's spine-tingling lead vocal on the Beach Boys' anthem, 'Sail on, Sailor', there must be something wrong with you. Blondie's ...

Eric Clapton: E.C. Was Here

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus Raves, December 1975

ALTHOUGH ULTIMATELY hopeful, Eric Clapton's greatest records – the towering Layla and the intimate 461 Ocean Boulevard – are liberally laced with sorrow and pain. ...

Eric Clapton: No Reason To Cry (RSO)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, October 1976

When Clapton’s good, he’s as good as they get — Layla stays in the "play" pile in every collection I have access to, Disraeli Gears ...

Eric Clapton: Rainbow Concert

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1973

In a form in which individual instrumental feats are often self-indulgent and superfluous, Eric Clapton's music remains an anomaly. His greatest guitar playing has been ...

Eric Clapton: There's One In Every Crowd

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

Eric Clapton's sense of well-being is reiterated on There's One in Every Crowd, but on this album it seems less a cause for joy than ...

Joe Cocker: The A&M Years 1968-1976

Overview by Bud Scoppa, unpublished, 1982

BETWEEN THE YEARS 1968 and 1976, Joe Cocker recorded his first seven albums (all released on A&M). These recordings were composed of a wonderfully diverse ...

Ry Cooder: Paradise And Lunch

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, July 1974

RY COODER has a corner of the rock & roll world all to himself. Like the folk traditionalists, he draws on dead or dying idioms ...

Creedence Clearwater Revival: Pendulum

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, February 1971

DON'T LET 'EM fool you. Pendulum is as distinctly Creedence as 'Proud Mary' or 'Lodi'. And that, I think, is good; Creedence music is one ...

Crosby Stills and Nash, Stephen Stills: Stephen Stills,Graham Nash and David Crosby Albums

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

Stephen Stills: ManassasGraham Nash/David Crosby: Graham Nash/David Crosby ...

Kiki Dee: I've Got the Music in Me

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, December 1974

In producer Gus Dudgeon and tourmate Elton John, Kiki Dee has the backing of the most successful team in Seventies pop music. If Elton and ...

Delaney & Bonnie: Delaney & Bonnie Together (Columbia)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1972

SOME PERFORMERS strain through prolonged public growing pains on their way to artistic maturity. Others simply appear with all their faculties fully intact. ...

John Denver: John Denver's Greatest Hits

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1974

JOHN DENVER has a strong and tuneful tenor, a smilingly ingenuous persona both vocally and visually and a sense of purpose to his writing and ...

John Denver: Rocky Mountain High

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1972

THERE HE IS on the screen of your color TV: blond, bespectacled, and peach-faced – the sight of him makes you want to adjust the ...

Doobie Brothers: The Doobie Brothers: The Captain And Me

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1973

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS are a mainstream rock band with a few crucial limitations and a knack of making good records despite their flaws. Their big ...

Dr. Feelgood: Dr Feelgood: Malpractice (Columbia)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, January 1976

People who have seen this determinedly primitive English rock & roll combo on stage tell me Dr Feelgood is very exciting and great fun, qualities ...

Ducks Deluxe: Ducks Deluxe

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, July 1974

DUCKS DELUXE is the first of the Americanophilic British bands (including Bees Make Honey, Gypsy, the defunct Help Yourself, and the ever-delightful Brinsley Schwarz) to ...

The Eagles: The Eagles

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

THE EAGLES' 'Take It Easy' is simply the best sounding rock single to come out so far this year. The first time through, you could ...

The Eagles: Hotel California (Asylum)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, February 1977

To many rock connoisseurs, Eagles records are about as appetizing as a Jumbo Jack: heavy on the packaging, standardized for mass-consumption, with nothing but go ...

The Eagles: One Of These Nights (Asylum)

Review and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1975

The Eagles’ new fourth album is at once the most musically adventurous and the most consistent work yet from this latter-day classic LA band. ...

The Eagles, Don Henley: Don Henley in Conversation

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Record, 1986

YOU'RE DON HENLEY. You spent the '70s behind a drum kit as a part of the Eagles, the quintessential American band of the era. Millions ...

Dave Edmunds: Rockpile

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1972

A YEAR AGO, Englishman Dave Edmunds introduced himself to the rock audience through a scrupulously crafted recording of 'I Hear You Knockin'', once a Fats ...

Dave Edmunds: Subtle As A Flying Mallet

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, July 1975

THIS ALBUM is a less unified work by this individualistic Welsh musician-producer than a gathering of tracks in varying modes that Edmunds has recorded since ...

Eurythmics: Savage

Review by Bud Scoppa, Creem, April 1988

SINCE 1980, when they left the Tourists to become a duo, Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox – a.k.a. the Eurythmics – have displayed an intriguing ...

The Everly Brothers: Stories We Could Tell

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1972

THE EVERLY BROTHERS brought harmony to rock and roll. They also brought sensitivity, the result of their having been weaned on old-time country music. They ...

The Faces: From Pop to Euphoria

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Circus, July 1970

CROWD SOUNDS from the English Soccer Championship [actually the FA Cup Final replay – RBP Ed. and Chelsea fan!] flooded the fourteenth floor of New ...

Feist: Metals (Polydor)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Uncut, November 2011

LESLIE FEIST'S career path has been a zigzag. The Nova Scotia-born, Toronto-based artist played guitar with rapper Peaches (who nicknamed her Bitch Lap Lap) and ...

Matthew Fisher: Journey's End

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1973

FROM THE ALBUM title and Fisher's sensitive-looking cover portrait, you might expect the first solo LP of the former Procol Harum organist to be unbearably ...

Fleetwood Mac: Fleetwood Mac

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1975

NOT ONLY IS Fleetwood Mac no longer blues oriented, it isn't even really British: The two newest members, Lindsey Buckingham (guitar and vocals) and Stevie ...

Fleetwood Mac: Bare Trees

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

FLEETWOOD MAC'S last two records, Kiln House and Future Games, have between them provided me with perhaps a hundred hours of enjoyment. And that's the ...

Fleetwood Mac: Fleetwood Mac

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus, November 1975

FROM LISTENING to Fleetwood Mac, you'd think this once-definitive British blues band was a Southern California pop group – and you'd be right. The three ...

Fleetwood Mac: Rumours

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, April 1977

I'M CONVINCED there's gonna be heavy bidding on the movie rights to this story. A legendary but unstable British rock band emigrates to L.A., ...

Flying Burrito Brothers: The Flying Burrito Brothers : Last of the Red Hot Burritos

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

The fourth – and presumably last – album of the Flying Burrito Bros. is, as it were, a departure. Not only is this album live, ...

John Fogerty: John Fogerty

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1975

JOHN FOGERTY singlehandedly prepares records that are virtually perfect in execution as well as conception: brilliantly concise self-expression, captivating and broad-based radio music. Though he ...

Foghat: Foghat (Bearsville)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1972

THAT'S FOGHAT, not Hogfat. And not Savoy Brown either, although with Lonesome Dave Peverett and Roger Earl in the lineup, one might see Hog – ...

Free: Heartbreaker

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1973

FREE IS AN ENGLISH quartet that toured with Blind Faith, had a big hit single, was hailed by the British press as the new Rolling ...

Marvin Gaye: I Want You (Motown)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus, August 1976

MARVIN GAYE, one of the most durable pop presences — his three-record compilation is easily the solidest of Motown's Anthology series — has in recent ...

J. Geils Band: J Geils Band: Bloodshot

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1973

During the last two years, Boston's J. Geils Band has built itself a national reputation as a tight, energetic, popular and extremely good-humored touring band. ...

Grandaddy: Sumday (V2)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, June 2003

IN JASON LYTLE’S WORLD – one that should be readily recognisable to the rest of us in this troubling decade – things are breaking down, ...

Grateful Dead: Blues For Allah (United Artists / Grateful Dead Records)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, September 1975

The first Dead album to be distributed by United Artists contains everything we’ve come to expect from the latter-day group and its offshoots: tuneless songs, ...

Grin: 1+1

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1972

THE DEBUT ALBUM of Nils Lofgren's trio, Grin, brilliantly closed the quartet of albums that had begun with the Neil Young/Crazy Horse collaboration, Everybody Knows ...

Grin: All Out

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1973

IN HIS WRITING, Grin leader Nils Lofgren shows a special affection for cowboy songs (not the actual music of the old West, but original tunes ...

Haim: Falling For Haim

Comment by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, October 2013

THIS HAS BEEN a bellwether year for young female artists, with the precocious Lorde and the irrepressible Miley Cyrus shaping their experiences into unfolding coming-of-age ...

Hall & Oates: War Babies

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1975

AFTER RECORDING Abandoned Luncheonette, an often ingenious merger of white acoustic pop and Philly soul, Philadelphians Hall & Oates disavowed that style, switched producers (from ...

Tim Hardin: Painted Heads

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1972

TIM HARDIN GOT so close to the top of the heap that it's hard to imagine how he could've blown it. ...

Emmylou Harris: EmmyLou Harris: Pieces of The Sky

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1975

WHEN THE BYRDS recorded Sweetheart of the Rodeo in 1968, the romance between country music and pop was still secret. Seven years later, both country ...

Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons: Gram Parsons with Emmylou Harris: Grievous Angel

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1974

MICK JAGGER wrote 'Wild Horses' for and about the late Gram Parsons and its chorus describes the paradox that fueled Parsons’ life and vision. '...Wild ...

Hipsway Takes The Plunge Crotch Deep In The Hoopla

Profile and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Creem, August 1987

HOW SWEET IT IS to be wanted – first by lotsa major-label A&R types, then by radio programmers, and finally by people with cash in ...

The Hollies: Another Night

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, February 1975

ALTHOUGH THEY survived the Sixties pretty much intact and with a substantial stack of notable hit records as their trophies, the Hollies never became the ...

Nicky Hopkins: The Tin Man Was a Dreamer

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1973

NICKY HOPKINS has gone into his first solo project in as careful and organized a manner as he goes into the studio to work on ...

Whitney Houston: The Long Road To Overnight Stardom

Report and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Billboard, December 1986

ONCE IN A BLUE MOON, a new artist emerges who simply takes over, in utterly decisive and undeniable fashion. So it was with Whitney Houston ...

The Incredible String Band, Lindisfarne, Pentangle, Plainsong, Richard Thompson, Steeleye Span: British Folk Rock: Robin Hood Rides A Chopper

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1973

Plainsong: In Search of Amelia Earhart (Elektra)Richard Thompson: Henry, the Human Fly (Warner Bros.)Steeleye Span: Below the Salt (Chrysalis)Incredible String Band: Earthspan (Reprise)Pentangle: Solomon's Seal ...

INXS: Splat! INXS Makes The Sound Of SUXS

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Creem, February 1988

INXS FRONTMAN Michael Hutchence is draped casually across an easy chair in a suite at West Hollywood's Sunset Marquis Hotel. An industrial vacuum cleaner rests ...

Chris Isaak Has It All Backwards

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Creem, October 1987

THREE TEENAGERS stand by the backstage door of the Hollywood Palace. As the sun sets behind them, the kids – two girls and a boy ...

Jefferson Starship: Dragon Fly

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1975

FOR SEVERAL YEARS, the nucleus of the Airplane/Starship has been struggling to hold together a concept that didn't seem workable in the first place. The ...

Elton John: Blue Moves

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, November 1976

THIS ISN'T SO much a review as it is a personally conducted poll. You see, I've been traveling around with Elton (the new album, that ...

Elton John: Caribou

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, August 1974

For an artist with distinct limitations – vocal, compositional, and stylistic – Elton John makes awfully good records. One of the reasons is his avowed ...

John Kay: My Sportin' Life

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1973

FROM THE VANTAGE point of 1968, that new tough-guy band called Steppenwolf had great prospects. ...

Speedy Keen: Previous Convictions

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1973

Knockabout drummer John "Speedy" Keen was rescued from oblivion by a perceptive Peter Townshend, who saw in Mr. Keen an offbeat but potentially compelling talent. ...

Kings of Leon: "The only people we could be completely honest with was family… It was us against the world!"

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Uncut, April 2007

After a righteous support slot on Bob Dylan's Never Ending Tour, Tennessee's true band of brothers Kings of Leon are back with a new album, ...

Kings of Leon: Kings Of Leon: Only By The Night

Review and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Uncut, October 2008

WHEN THE KINGS Of Leon recorded their Holy Roller Novocaine EP in 2002, they were musical novices ranging in age from 15 to 22, but ...

Kings of Leon: Good Old Boys: Kings of Leon: Come Around Sundown (RCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, October 2010

WHEN THE Followill brothers and their cousin Matthew first busted out of Tennessee in 2003 with the colorfully titled EP Holy Roller Novocaine, they were ...

Alison Krauss, Robert Plant: Robert Plant and Alison Krauss: Raising Sand

Review by Bud Scoppa, Uncut, 2008

THE PAIRING OF the wily old tomcat and the classy country thrush turns out as magically in reality as it seemed unlikely on paper. ...

Alvin Lee: On The Road To Freedom

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1974

TWO OFTEN UNPERSUASIVE musicians have combined to make an album better than any of their past work. Alvin Lee and Mylon LeFevre may have always ...

Gordon Lightfoot: Cold on the Shoulder (Reprise)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

FOR A DECADE NOW, Gordon Lightfoot has been a neo-folk hero in Canada. His early records and performances were distinguished by a rugged romanticism that ...

Lindisfarne: Fog on the Tyne

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1972

FOG ON the Tyne has been just about the biggest album in Great Britain this year. The single off the album, 'Meet Me on the ...

Little Feat: Dixie Chicken

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1973

LIKE THEIR much more famous cousins, the Rolling Stones and Van Morrison, Little Feat are eclectic in a vertical rather than a horizontal way. They ...

Little Feat: Sailin' Shoes

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1972

NOW, HERE'S A BAND with a mission. Little Feat is hewn from the same piece of oak as the Byrds, the Band, and the Flying ...

Little Feat: Time Waits for Columbus

Sleevenotes by Bud Scoppa, Rhino Records, October 2001

WHAT CONSTITUTES a great live album? It’s clearly not the mere replication of a band’s studio performances. That approach may satisfy the attending audience, but ...

Little Feat: The Little Feat Saga

Sleevenotes by Bud Scoppa, Rhino Records, February 2000

This is the story of a great American band, a band as quintessentially SoCal as the Beach Boys, as rootsy as the Band, as funky ...

Loggins & Messina: Kenny Loggins with Jim Messina "Sittin' In"

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1972

THIS ALBUM answers the "whatever happened to Jim Messina?" question resoundingly. Although singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins is very much in the forefront throughout the album, Messina's ...

The Long Ryders: Long Ryders Renovating Byrdsland

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Record, April 1984

Los Angeles — Sid Griffin, 27-year-old guitarist and founding member of the Long Ryders, machine-guns opinions as well as he emulates the onstage moves of ...

Lynyrd Skynyrd: Nuthin' Fancy

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1975

WITH THREE full-time electric guitarists, a piano player and a fireplug of a lead singer who looks like Robert Blake's Baretta in a hippie disguise, ...

Lynyrd Skynyrd: Second Helping (MCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Crawdaddy!, September 1974

FLORIDA's Lynyrd Skynyrd keeps getting compared to the Allman Brothers Band, mostly because the group is Southern, and because lead singer Ronnie Van Zant has ...

Man: Rhinos, Winos & Lunatics

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1974

Man is a Welsh-based band with its heart in San Francisco–specifically, in the elongated and textured music of Quicksilver and the early Dead. Earlier versions ...

Dave Mason: It's Like You Never Left

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1974

THAT FIRST AUTHENTIC follow-up to Alone Together finally exists. But while his skills as a musician are as noticeable as before, Dave Mason seems to ...

Ian Matthews: If You Saw Thro' My Eyes (Vertigo)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1971

AFTER A TWO-ALBUM stint with Fairport Convention, Ian Matthews made a solo LP, Matthews Southern Comfort, formed a band called Matthews Southern Comfort, and proceeded ...

Roger McGuinn, Stephen Stills: Steven Stills, Roger McGuinn & Band Albums

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

Roger McGuinn: Roger McGuinn & Band (Columbia)Stephen Stills: Stills (Columbia) ...

Terry Melcher: Terry Melcher

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, June 1974

THIS ALBUM is definitely not for everyone. Terry Melcher, once the producer of the Byrds and Paul Revere and the Raiders, has released an eccentric ...

Frankie Miller Band: The Rock

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, 1975

AFTER AN EXCELLENT debut album (still unreleased in the U.S.) with backing by the underrated Brinsley Schwarz group, Scotish rock & roll singer Frankie Miller ...

Steve Miller Band: Fly Like An Eagle (Capitol)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1976

Steve Miller is a bright guy and a fine musician who can rock with the best of them. ...

Steve Miller Band: Recall The Beginning…

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1972

WAY BACK in the Sixties, three bands in particular were responsible for recharging my rock fanaticism – Procol Harum, the Byrds, and the Steve Miller ...

Steve Miller: The Steve Miller Band: The Joker (Capitol)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1973

STEVE MILLER is responsible for three of the best and one of the worst albums I own. ...

The Moody Blues: Gentle, Smooth and Nice

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Circus, August 1970

THE FIVE RATHER dapper looking musicians on the Fillmore East stage began a song, and some members of the audience craned their heads to look ...

Van Morrison: A Period Of Transition

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, May 1977

"It’s just what it is – it says what it is and nobody is going to analyze it for secret meanings. It’s exactly what it ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott the Hoople Causes Hoopla

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus, July 1970

LISTENING TO A "sounds from England" segment on a local FM station several months ago, there was, surprisingly, what sounded like an outtake from the ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott: No Success like Failure

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1973

WHAT AN ARRAY of weapons this band has: awesome firepower, an ever-increasing depth of expression, timely themes and an artistic way of mixing qualities on ...

Mott The Hoople: Mott the Hoople: All the Young Dudes

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1972

Taking what does not belong to you is a crucial part of the process of creating rock & roll: Exploiting proven riffs, phrases and hooks, ...

Elliott Murphy: Elliot Murphy: Night Lights (RCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, March 1976

Lost Generation, the second album by this hero-obsessed New Yorker, made it clear that Murphy’s haughty, proper-noun-laden style could be undercut by unsympathetic or insensitive ...

Rick Nelson: Intakes

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, August 1977

BEFORE I RECEIVED a test pressing of the new Rick Nelson album, I was informed that this elpee marked a big change in direction for ...

Randy Newman: Having Fun But Not Making A Habit Of It

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Sounds, June 1971

WHEN RANDY Newman finally decided to become a performer rather than continue his career as a sequestered genius — "I was surprised when I did ...

Harry Nilsson: Duit On Mon Dei

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1975

HARRY NILSSON hasn't made a good album since '71's Nilsson Schmilsson, the recording that brought him the sales and critical esteem he'd deserved all along. ...

Harry Nilsson: Nilsson: Nilsson Schmilsson (RCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1972

IS NILSSON just an old-school crooner in modern dress? Is he a writer of children's songs who wants to broaden his appeal? And why does ...

Robert Palmer: Pressure Drop

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1976

BRITISHER Robert Palmer is another marcher in the growing column of white folks who prefer playing it greasy and getting down (notable recent examples: Bowie, ...

Gram Parsons: GP

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, March 1973

GRAM PARSONS is an artist with a vision as unique and personal as those of Jagger-Richard, Ray Davies, or any of the other celebrated figures. ...

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers: Tom Petty: Less Is More, More Or Less

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Creem, August 1987

"She hit me, Daddy!""I did not." ...

Pink Floyd: Wish You Were Here (Columbia)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, October 1975

Although Pink Floyd has always represented itself – through album graphics, song and album titles, and stage presentation – as working in the outer limits ...

Poco

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Circus, August 1971

POCO IS THE only rock 'n' roll band I've ever seen whose members smile as they sing - it's hard to grin with your mouth ...

Poco: A Good Feelin' to Know

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1972

I'VE JUST come home from seeing Poco play. They were terrific, significantly better than the last few times I heard them in concert. ...

The Pretty Things: Silk Torpedo

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

THE PRETTY THINGS are from a different part of town. Once competitors with the Stones in the raunch-and-outrage genre, the Pretty Things began a progression ...

Procol Harum: Grand Hotel

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1973

YOU CAN'T DENY Procol Harum their important place in rock's scheme of things. They were the first to bring together the energy and mood of ...

Procol Harum: Procol's Ninth

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1975

PROCOL HARUM, down to delusions of grandeur after losing key members (like Robin Trower and Matthew Fisher) and running desperately low on ideas has been ...

Queen: Sheer Heart Attack

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1975

TWO OF THe MOST liberated and ambitious of the "fun" oriented British bands beginning to make their mark in the States are the updated war-horses ...

Radiohead: Hail to the Thief (Capitol)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, June 2003

"IS THAT BACKWARDS?" a colleague asked of the music I was playing as he passed by my office. "That's not backwards," I replied; "it's Radiohead." ...

Lou Reed: Rock N Roll Animal

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, April 1974

LOU REED'S LAST album, Berlin, vividly demonstrated how his talent can be misrepresented and abused. Berlin failed not because of its theme or its viewpoint, ...

The Rolling Stones: Cocksucker Blues: A Film by Robert Frank and Danny Seymour

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, December 1976

This unreleased – and suppressed – documentary of The Stones’ ’72 US tour is far and away the most revealingly powerful rock & roll movie ...

The Rolling Stones: Goat's Head Soup

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1973

HISTORY HAS PROVEN it unwise to jump to conclusions about Rolling Stones albums. At first Sticky Fingers seemed merely a statement of doper hipness on ...

The Rolling Stones: Black And Blue (COC)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, May 1976

IN THE FOUR years that have passed since the release of Exile On Main Street, perhaps their greatest album, The Stones have managed to put ...

Rufus: Rags To Rufus (ABC)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1974

RAGS TO RUFUS, the second LP from the pop group turned soul band, is most notable for lead singer Chaka Khan’s inspired performances. ...

Savoy Brown: Hellbound Train

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1972

Savoy Brown was once a resolutely typical British blues band. They could boogy an audience into submission in no time at all, and then keep ...

Boz Scaggs: My TIme

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1972

BOZ SCAGGS has one of the sweetest, most engaging voices around, and his recent albums have been on the sweet and friendly side, too. Records ...

Boz Scaggs: Silk Degrees (Columbia)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, April 1976

For eight years, Boz Scaggs has been making playable, durable albums (counting the new one, there are now six solo LPs, and before that Scaggs ...

Simon & Garfunkel: All Gone To Look for America: Simon & Garfunkel

Sleevenotes by Bud Scoppa, Sony Legacy, February 2001

Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. THE NOTION THAT BABY BOOMERS can stake the first claim on rock and roll is a fiction. The fact is, it ...

The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band: Souther Hillman Furay: Trouble in Paradise

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1975

IN CONCERT LAST year, Richie Furay seemed bewildered, as if he'd suddenly found himself onstage not with his own band but rather with a bunch ...

Spirit: Spirit of '76

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

FROM ITS CONCEPTION to its sonics, Spirit of '76 is this year's eccentric's eccentric record, and Randy California (last heard from as "Kapt. Kopter" on ...

Bruce Springsteen: At the Roxy, Los Angeles

Live Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, November 1975

PEOPLE WHO who were clearly not accustomed to standing in line formed a reluctant column along Sunset Boulevard; hordes of photographers snapped at the famous ...

Squeeze: The Squeeze Story

Retrospective and Interview by Bud Scoppa, Music Connection, January 1988

WHEN A&M LONDON picked up Squeeze in 1977, after landing and subsequently letting go of the Sex Pistols, the band was considered to be one ...

Stealers Wheel: Stealers Wheel

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1973

YOU'VE PROBABLY discovered by now that ‘Stuck in the Middle with You’, the single you thought was the best Dylan record since 1966, is actually ...

Steely Dan: Pretzel Logic

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, May 1974

STEELY DAN is the most improbable hit-singles band to emerge in ages. On its three albums, the group has developed an impressionistic approach to rock ...

Steely Dan: The Royal Scam

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus, August 1976

DONALD FAGEN AND Walter Becker don't play by the rules. They won't tour, they won't talk to interviewers, they won't keep a band together — ...

Steppenwolf: For Ladies Only

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1971

STEPPENWOLF IS LIKE the football club that always wins more than it loses, and perennially finishes second or third in its conference – something like ...

Cat Stevens: It Must Be Destiny

Live Review by Bud Scoppa, Crawdaddy!, June 1971

CAT STEVENS couldn't come along at a better time. Time magazine has informed us that we're entering a period of gentle, reflective, and introspective music, ...

Cat Stevens: Easy Does It: Cat Stevens

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Rock, May 1971

STEPHEN GIORGIO and Alun Davies sat in straight-backed chairs facing 2300 non-believers. From the Fillmore East balcony, Cat Stevens and partner looked hopelessly tiny. Just ...

John Stewart: The Phoenix Concerts (RCA)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1974

THE MERE SOUND of John Stewart’s tremulous voice is enough to conjure up the ghost of an antique, heroic America. Stewart’s songs — 16 of ...

Rod Stewart: A Night On The Town

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, August 1976

AFTER HIS LAST great album, 1972's Never a Dull Moment, Rod Stewart began casting off much of what we'd come to love him for: the ...

Rod Stewart: Atlantic Crossing

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus, November 1975

HAPPILY, THAT HORNY, rank, exuberant rascal who romped through Rod Stewart's masterpieces Gasoline Alley, Every Picture Tells a Story and Never a Dull Moment has ...

Rod Stewart: Gasoline Alley

Review by Bud Scoppa, Circus, July 1970

IT'S BECOMING increasingly obvious that Rod Stewart is an unusually gifted singer and writer. His new album, Gasoline Alley, even more than his first solo ...

Stories: Ian Lloyd & Stories: Traveling Underground

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, February 1974

STORIES COPED with the loss of founder Michael Brown (a fine keyboard player and songwriter who also led the Left Banke) by recording 'Brother Louie', ...

The Strawbs: Grave New World

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1972

WHEN DAVE COUSINS got together with Tony Hooper to form the Strawbs, he was writing songs strongly influenced by British and American traditional music. ...

Sutherland Brothers and Quiver: Sutherland Brothers & Quiver: Dream Kid

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, May 1974

WHEN Quiver and the Sutherland Brothers – two groups then practically unknown in the U.S. – joined forces to last year to accentuate the positive ...

Sutherland Brothers and Quiver: Reach for the Sky

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1976

THIS CLASSY ROCK GROUP from Britain somehow managed, over the course of its three Island albums, to grow progressively more obscure, despite an infectious '73 ...

James Taylor: Gorilla

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, July 1975

JAMES TAYLOR pretty much wrote the book for the singer/songwriters of the Seventies. That may be a dubious distinction but Taylor's early work, characterized by ...

Third Eye Blind: Blue (Elektra)

Review by Bud Scoppa, sonicnet.com, 1999

IN THE APTLY-TITLED ‘Camouflage’, which makes up a chunk of the meaty second half of Third Eye Blind's second album, guitarist Kevin Cadogan fires off ...

Three Dog Night: Coming Down Your Way

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1975

THIS ALBUM clearly marks the demise of Three Dog Night, actually if not yet officially. It's the latest and worst in a series of terribly ...

Three Dog Night: Harmony

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, December 1971

FOR THREE YEARS now, the critics have been laying into Three Dog Night for a variety of mostly hard-to-fathom reasons. But nobody, evidently, has been ...

Robin Trower: Trower’s Travails

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Guitar World, July 1988

IT’S ONE THING to be influenced by Jimi Hendrix, it's something else altogether to be hounded by Hendrix' ghost, as Robin Trower has been for ...

Dwight Twilley: Sincerely

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, September 1976

IN AMERICA'S LESS CRISS-crossed midsection, young rockers have the opportunity to incubate their dreams – and their talents – free of pressure. The most romantic ...

Dwight Twilley: Twilley Don’t Mind

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, August 1977

EVERYBODY KNOWS that people who write record reviews are supposed to complain every so often about what a crummy year it’s been for music, and ...

Utopia: Todd Rundgren’s Utopia: Another Live (Bearsville)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, November 1975

With a running time of just 45 minutes and one entire side of highly accessible rock & roll, Todd Rundgren’s Another Live represents a return ...

Loudon Wainwright III: Album III

Review by Bud Scoppa, Creem, January 1973

IT'S IMPOSSIBLE to forget the sight of Loudon Wainwright singing: head turned upward and wobbling loosely on his hunched shoulders, his face contorted in response ...

Joe Walsh: So What

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, April 1975

As he's moved westward – from the East Coast to Ohio to Colorado to Los Angeles–Joe Walsh has assimilated one regional rock style after another. ...

Bob Weir: Ace

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, August 1972

REVIEWS OF GRATEFUL Dead records are invariably written by those who've been touched by that mysterious and to me incomprehensible power-to-enchant that exists somewhere in ...

Wet Willie: Wet Willie

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1971

WET WILLIE is young five-man group originally from Mobile, Alabama, that's been touring with the Allman Brothers Band lately, and winning a bunch of new ...

Whitesnake: Slip of the Tongue (Geffen)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Spin, February 1990

A VENERABLE Brit rock band whose only constant was crusty-throated journeyman David Coverdale (his main claim to fame being a 1973-1976 stint as Deep Purple's ...

The Who: Tommy on the Silver Screen

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, April 1975

Pre-release skepticism was clearly in order. The handing over of Townshend’s likeable but jumbled spiritual parable to filmdom’s master of the Technicolor sick joke seemed ...

Wilco: The Whole Love (dBpm)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, December 2011

WILCO FANS ARE AS polarized as the US congress. Some revel in the band's eardrum-pulverizing forays into the sonic unknown, introduced on 2000's art-damaged Yankee ...

Jesse Winchester: Learn To Love It

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, October 1974

ON JESSE WINCHESTER'S first two albums, Jesse Winchester and Third Down, 110 To Go, the fine balance struck between conviction and melodiousness, simplicity and eloquence ...

Ronnie Wood: Now Look (Warner Bros.)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, July 1975

Hey, this is good. Not good-despite-sloppiness like Wood’s earlier solo album, but unreservedly good. ...

Ronnie Wood: I've Got My Own Album To Do

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1974

RON WOOD, whose role in the Faces has paralleled Keith Richard's function in the Rolling Stones, has put together what is less a solo album ...

Neil Young: Tonight's the Night: Play It Loud and Stay in the Other Room!

Interview by Bud Scoppa, New Musical Express, June 1975

NEIL YOUNG isn't out to win any popularity contest. Just as he reached the top of the heap three years ago with the huge-selling Harvest, ...

Neil Young (2005)

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages Audio, August 2005

Mr. Young on the Prairie Wind album; his aneurysm and surgery; the great Spooner Oldham; his archive project; and the Heart of Gold movie.

File format: mp3; file size: 46.6mb, interview length: 50' 55" sound quality: ****

Neil Young and Crazy Horse: Zuma

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1976

"It's another rock & roll album. A lot of instrumental things... it's about the Incas and the Aztecs. It takes on another personality. It's like ...

Neil Young: American Stars ’n Bars (Reprise)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1977

Superstar-turned-cult-attraction Young has thrown a change of pace by serving up a tasty platter of palatable musical morsels. Long considered the godfather of agony rock ...

Neil Young: Are You Passionate? (Reprise)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, April 2002

NEIL YOUNG'S new studio opus opens with a quintessentially sultry Stax/Volt groove, courtesy of the Booker T. & the MGs rhythm section, over which Young’s ...

Neil Young: Time Fades Away

Review by Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, January 1974

THIS ALBUM may do for Neil Young's declining image what Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid did for Dylan's. But like Dylan's much-maligned movie soundtrack ...

Neil Young: Tonight's The Night

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1975

...At the canyon bottom, four cruisers were spinning blue light; there was an ambulance and four civilian cars, all balanced on the sloping shoulder of ...

Neil Young: The Unwilling Superstar

Interview by Bud Scoppa, Creem, November 1975

NEIL YOUNG ISN'T out to win any popularity contests. Just as he reached the top of the heap three years ago with the huge-selling Harvest, ...

Warren Zevon: Sentimental Hygiene

Review by Bud Scoppa, Creem, October 1987

AS A HARD-BOILED confessional work, Sentimental Hygiene (Zevon's seventh album and his first in five years) has less in common with current rock than it ...

Warren Zevon: Warren Zevon (Asylum)

Review by Bud Scoppa, Phonograph Record, June 1976

THEY'RE ALL HERE – various Eagles, an Everly Brother, Buckingham/Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Carl Wilson, David Lindley, J.D. Souther, and Jackson Browne himself, acting as producer ...

List of genre pieces

Confessions of a Grammy Nom

Report by Bud Scoppa, Rock's Backpages, March 2001

"I Was Robbed," A Loser Whines, Then Delivers An Acceptance Speech That Never Was ...

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